Coker Tire Museum – Traveling Through Time

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America’s landscape is laced with “pockets of discovery,” places that reveal treasures that all too often fall below the radar. Case in point is a city many consider to be the Crown Jewel of the South—Chattanooga, Tennessee. Nestled along the banks of the Tennessee River, which cuts and winds through the bucolic highlands of the Volunteer State, Chattanooga hosts several treasures that will make the automotive, truck, and motorcycle aficionado cry bonanza. One is the Coker Tire museum.

Read the source article at Truck Trend Network

Hankook Steps Up To The Plate With 2017 ‘Great Catch’ Rebate Promotion

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As professional baseball teams and fans get ready for the start of the 2017 season, Hankook Tire America offers consumers a home run with its 2017 “Great Catch” mail-in rebate promotion. Drivers can save on seven of Hankook’s most popular passenger and light truck tires.

Consumers who purchase four qualifying Hankook tires from an authorized Hankook dealer between March 18-31 can save up to $100 through a mail-in rebate. According to the latest Hankook Tire Gauge Index, 55 percent of Americans have purchased tires through a rebate offer.

Drivers can save up to $100 on the purchase of a set of Hankook tires through the Great Catch rebate program, which runs through May 31.

Read the source article at Aftermarket News

One vote altered final ITC antidumping decision

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WASHINGTON — The shift of one vote caused the International Trade Commission (ITC) to make a final determination that the U.S. truck and bus tire manufacturing industry is not being materially injured because of imports from China.

The ITC made a negative determination on material injury against the U.S. truck and bus tire industry Feb. 22 on a 3-2 vote. A year earlier, the commission made an affirmative preliminary determination by a 3-2 vote.

The ITC made its final report available to the public on March 22.

ITC Vice Chairman David S. Johanson voted with Chairman Rhonda K. Schmidtlein and Commissioner Irving A. Williamson in the preliminary determination in favor of a finding of material injury. At that time, however, Mr. Johanson filed his separate views.

In his preliminary views, Mr. Johanson agreed with most of the findings of Ms. Schmidtlein and Mr. Williamson. He found that Chinese imports increased in both absolute terms and relative to U.S. consumption and production during the 2013-2015 period of investigation.

During the period, he said, Chinese imports captured 5.1 percentage points of market share from the domestic industry.

Mr. Johanson also found that imports from other countries, though gaining in U.S. market share, gained less than Chinese imports.

“In 31 of 37 quarterly comparisons between the prices of imports from China and Canada, the prices of imports from Canada were higher than those from China,” he wrote. “The prices of imports from Canada were even higher than U.S.-produced tires in nearly half of the quarterly comparisons.”

Considering data on capital investments in the domestic industry, Mr. Johanson said he found it unlikely that the domestic industry would perform as well in the near term as it did during the period of investigation.

“Nevertheless, given the domestic industry’s performance throughout the period, I do not find that the domestic industry is currently in a vulnerable state,” he said.

In the final determination, Mr. Johanson voted with Commissioners Meredith M. Broadbent and F. Scott Kieff, who repeated their negative findings on material injury.

“The domestic industry was able to increase output, employment and profitability levels during the period of investigation,” said the majority opinion in the final ITC report.

“While the domestic industry lost market share during a time of rising demand, we have found that the decline of market share was due to capacity limitations and very high capacity utilization, rather than to the subject imports,” the document said.

“We further found that the increased volume of low-priced subject imports had no significant price effects and coincided with significant improvement in the domestic industry’s condition,” it said.

In their dissenting views, Ms. Schmidtlein and Mr. Williamson wrote, “We find that a significant volume of subject imports from China has undersold the domestic like product, significantly depressed U.S. prices and caused material injury to the domestic industry.”

Ms. Schmidtlein and Mr. Williamson discounted evidence that the domestic industry’s performance improved during the period of investigation.

“The U.S. industry was profitable, and profits grew over the period, but the overall increase was modest considering the significant increase in demand over the investigation period and the opportunity to benefit from lower costs,” they wrote.

The United Steelworkers union petitioned the ITC for antidumping and countervailing duty relief against Chinese truck and bus tire imports in January 2016. Commissioner Dean A. Pinkert did not participate in the investigation. Shortly after the final vote was taken, Mr. Pinkert announced his return to private law practice.

 

According to the ITC, there are seven truck and bus tire plants in the U.S., employing 6,629.

The apparent dollar value of truck and bus tire consumption in 2015 was $6.1 billion, the ITC said.

Chinese imports accounted for $1.2 billion of that total, with $1.3 billion coming from other countries including Canada, Japan and Thailand.

China continued last year as the No. 1 source of imported truck/bus tires, despite shipments falling 14.4 percent, to 7.63 million units. Overall imports were off as well, by 3.8 percent to 13.9 million units. 

Thailand’s truck/bus tire exports to the U.S. jumped 98.7 percent to 1.82 million units, making that nation the No. 2 source of imported truck tires last year.

Canada, Japan and South Korea were third through fifth on the list, with South Korea’s exports to the U.S. growing 85.1 percent to 421,239 units.

Read the source article at Tire Business

King Tire adds ContiLifeCycle at 2nd plant

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BLUEFIELD, W.Va. — King Tire Service Inc. has renewed its commitment to the ContiLifeCycle retreading system and converted its second plant, in Bristol, Va., to the Conti system, according to Continental Tire the Americas L.L.C.

King Tire was the first ContiLifeCycle partner in the U.S., agreeing in 2011 to convert its retread plant in Bluefield to the Conti system.

The location in Bristol is a former Blevins Tire & Recapping shop that King Tire took over in 2014 and continued to operate until now as a Marangoni-system operation, according to Ed King, vice president of King Tire Service and manager of recapping and warehousing.

The company decided last year to upgrade the Bristol facility with new equipment and convert it to the ContiLifeCycle system, Mr. King said, without disclosing the firm’s investment in the renovation.

Read the source article at Tire Business

TBC Brands Rolling Out New Sumitomo Truck Tire at MATS

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TBC Brands will unveil its newest Sumitomo branded tire – the ST719SE Regional Steer – during the Mid-America Trucking Show (MATS) from March 23-25 at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, Ky.

“We’re excited to unveil another great product development at MATS this year,” said Aaron C. Murphy, vice president of commercial truck tire sales.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Kenda Partners with VORE Adrenaline Compound

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Kenda Tires has been named the Official Tire Sponsor of the off-road driving experience VORE Adrenaline Compound.

“We are happy to announce our partnership with the VORE Adrenaline Compound,” said Jimmy Yang, president of Kenda Tires. “VORE will be another platform for Kenda to prove the durability and performance of our light truck products as well as our ultra-high performance tires.”

Read the source article at Tire Review

Apollo can grow more in Europe

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As part of a bid to expand global presence, the Indian tyre giant, Apollo Tyres Ltd., is currently concentrating more and more on Europe as well as other geographies. At present, Apollo is fast moving ahead with the construction of a Greenfield facility in Hungary which would be rolling out tyres within 2 months.

Read the source article at Rubber Asia

ITC decision leaves USW, retreaders reeling

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WASHINGTON (Feb. 24, 2017) — The United Steelworkers (USW) union and U.S. retreaders are reeling in the wake of the U.S. International Trade Commission’s (ITC) decision to not impose import duties on Chinese truck and bus tire imports.

The 3-2 ITC vote on Feb. 20 that the U.S. truck and bus tire industry has not suffered material injury because of Chinese imports means the U.S. Department of Commerce will not order U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect antidumping and countervailing duties from Chinese truck and bus tire manufacturers and importers.

The USW union, which had petitioned the ITC for duties a year ago, expressed disappointment at the agency’s decision, as did represesentatives of the U.S. retreading industry, which supported elevated duties on Chinese truck/bus tires as a way to keep an important price differential between new Chinese tires and retreaded truck tires.

“Of all the stakeholders in this, retreaders are the ones who are hurt the most,” said Terry Westhafer, president of Verona, Va.-based retreading firm Central Tire Co.

Considering the fact that the Commerce Department had issued final antidumping and countervailing duties against Chinese tire makers in late January, Mr. Westhafer said it is hard to understand how the ITC failed to find material injury in this investigation.

Read the source article at Tire Business

China slides to No. 2 U.S. tire trading partner

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 14, 2017) — Canada replaced China last year as the No. 1 trading partner of the U.S. in tires, as the value of China’s imports to the U.S. — impacted primarily by the cut in consumer tire shipments due to the elevated import tariffs on passenger and light truck tires — tumbled nearly 43 percent to $1.52 billion.

The value of Canada’s imports fell as well, but by only 1.9 percent, to $1.59 billion, a volume that was sufficient to allow Canada to claim top billing, according to Tire Business‘ analysis of the 2016 data from the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Overall, the value of imports fell 10 percent vs. 2015, with reduced trade in passenger and truck tires influencing the change the most, Commerce Department data shows.

The value of South Korea’s imports inched up 0.7 percent to $1.43 billion to claim third, while the value of Thailand’s imports to the U.S. rose 21.2 percent to $1.37 billion, reflecting a 24.2-percent jump in passenger tire imports and a near doubling in truck/bus tire imports as Chinese manufacturers shifted production to plants in Thailand.

The value of Japan’s imports fell 18.6 percent to $1.18 billion, dropping that nation to fifth on the list of trading partners from third in 2015.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Conti promotes 2 in PLT tire R&D

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HANNOVER, Germany (March 14, 2017) — Continental A.G. has promoted Marco Gellings and Denise Ewald to new positions in its passenger and light truck (PLT) tire development unit.

Mr. Gellings, previously head of summer tire line development for the Middle East, Europe and Africa region, is now head of winter tire development worldwide.

The change was effective Jan. 1. Conti did not say whom he replaced, if anyone.

A mechanical engineer by training, he has been with Continental in research and development since 2001.

Ms. Ewald succeeded Mr. Gellings as head of summer tire line development, effective Feb. 1. An industrial engineering graduate, Ms. Ewald has held a variety of positions at Continental since joining the company in 2006.

Read the source article at Tire Business