With Hungary plant, Apollo Tyres eyes 3.5% market share in Europe

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With the Hungary plant going on stream, Apollo Tyres plans to increase its market share to 3.5 per cent in the next two-three years from the current 2.5 per cent in Europe. And, it plans to start supplying to major brands, including Volkswagen and Mercedes-Benz. It also said the US would be its next stop for building brands. Apollo Tyres Vice-Chairman and Managing Director Neeraj Kanwar said its Vision 2020 for Europe was to be a premium brand both in terms of size and price.

Read the source article at business-standard.com

Supply and demand of neutral bearish rubber fell sharply

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March, natural rubber continued unilateral decline in the trend continued to continue unilateral decline, and continue to hit a new low, but then encounter, stabilized stabilized, and returned to a technical rebound, which reflects the supply and demand of natural rubber market The relationship is reversed from the background and the essence of the reversal.

Prospects and Strategy Suggestions

Looking forward to April trend, by the international and domestic aspects of the neutral factors of the neutral intertwined effect, in the surrounding Tokyo City, Singapore rubber market both down the trend of deep down, Hujiao market outlook will continue the formation of the original deep down Of the trend, while subject to the global macroeconomic and financial situation neutral factors, although the short-term may fall sharply, but the medium-term may return to the low regional concussion trend, the operation should be short-term low-absorbing high-throwing.

Read the source article at Global Rubber Markets News

Atlas Tire Hosts ATU

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Atlas Tire Wholesale recently hosted the summer edition of their renowned Atlas Tire University program. Besides hearing about the latest tire technologies and products, guests who attended the event also learned about the most up-to-date online marketing and social media strategies.

ATU invited social media expert, Casey Walter from Optimize Social Media in Oakdale, Minnesota to speak about strategies tire retailers can put into practice today in order to better position their companies online to compete in today’s challenging market.

Besides a host of Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Yelp, Google+ and Instagram strategies, Walter also spoke about online reputation management, and how to deal with disgruntled customers who complain about your tire business on social media.

Atlas Tire also invited Michal Majernik, Manager, Communications for the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC) to talk about the latest and most pertinent statistics tire statistics. Majernik also discussed the demise of the Ontario Tire Stewardship program, and explained how Ontario’s tire recycling infrastructure is likely to change in the near future.

In addition to a gourmet lunch, guests of Atlas Tire enjoyed giveaways and prizes throughout the day, as well as an opportunity to network with peers along with tire industry representatives and experts.

Read the source article at Autosphere.ca

Goodyear positioned to benefit from industry trends

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Trends in the global tire industry play to the strengths of The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company and its strategy to drive profitable growth.

“The accelerating shift to high-value-added tires for both consumer vehicles and commercial trucks is the main product trend shaping the future of the tire industry,” Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President Richard J. Kramer said at the company’s recent annual shareholder meeting.

Read the source article at Traction News

Cooper Product Videos Win Telly Awards

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Two product videos for Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. took home Bronze honors in the Telly Awards competition.

The award-winning videos included the 2015 video announcing the Discoverer STT Pro off-road tire and a 2016 video that debuted the Cooper Zeon RS3-G1 high performance passenger car tire.

The award-winning videos can be viewed at Cooper’s YouTube page at youtube.com/coopertire.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Industry Trends May Positively Impact Goodyear

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Global trends within the tire industry play to Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.’s strengths, the tiremaker said during a recent shareholder’s meeting.

“The accelerating shift to high-value-added tires for both consumer vehicles and commercial trucks is the main product trend shaping the future of the tire industry,” said Rich Kramer, CEO and president of Goodyear.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Goodyear benefitting from tyre industry trends, says Kramer

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During the company’s annual shareholder meeting yesterday, Richard Kramer stated that trends within the global tyre industry are playing to Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company’s strengths and its strategy to drive profitable growth. This growth, he added, is best represented within the consumer tyre business by the rising demand for tyres with 17-inch and larger rim diameters – the market for this segment has doubled since 2010 and is expected to double again by 2020.

Read the source article at Tyrepress

Hankook Buys Jax

Hankook Tire acquires Australian tire retailer, JAX Tyres.

Hankook says they aim to strengthen their global distribution business model with the acquisition of JAX Tyres in Australia.

As part of the Hankook Tire Group, JAX Tyre will have the opportunity for continued growth through the expansion of existing stores, strengthened online capabilities and enhanced brand value.

Read the source article at Autosphere.ca

One vote altered final ITC antidumping decision

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WASHINGTON — The shift of one vote caused the International Trade Commission (ITC) to make a final determination that the U.S. truck and bus tire manufacturing industry is not being materially injured because of imports from China.

The ITC made a negative determination on material injury against the U.S. truck and bus tire industry Feb. 22 on a 3-2 vote. A year earlier, the commission made an affirmative preliminary determination by a 3-2 vote.

The ITC made its final report available to the public on March 22.

ITC Vice Chairman David S. Johanson voted with Chairman Rhonda K. Schmidtlein and Commissioner Irving A. Williamson in the preliminary determination in favor of a finding of material injury. At that time, however, Mr. Johanson filed his separate views.

In his preliminary views, Mr. Johanson agreed with most of the findings of Ms. Schmidtlein and Mr. Williamson. He found that Chinese imports increased in both absolute terms and relative to U.S. consumption and production during the 2013-2015 period of investigation.

During the period, he said, Chinese imports captured 5.1 percentage points of market share from the domestic industry.

Mr. Johanson also found that imports from other countries, though gaining in U.S. market share, gained less than Chinese imports.

“In 31 of 37 quarterly comparisons between the prices of imports from China and Canada, the prices of imports from Canada were higher than those from China,” he wrote. “The prices of imports from Canada were even higher than U.S.-produced tires in nearly half of the quarterly comparisons.”

Considering data on capital investments in the domestic industry, Mr. Johanson said he found it unlikely that the domestic industry would perform as well in the near term as it did during the period of investigation.

“Nevertheless, given the domestic industry’s performance throughout the period, I do not find that the domestic industry is currently in a vulnerable state,” he said.

In the final determination, Mr. Johanson voted with Commissioners Meredith M. Broadbent and F. Scott Kieff, who repeated their negative findings on material injury.

“The domestic industry was able to increase output, employment and profitability levels during the period of investigation,” said the majority opinion in the final ITC report.

“While the domestic industry lost market share during a time of rising demand, we have found that the decline of market share was due to capacity limitations and very high capacity utilization, rather than to the subject imports,” the document said.

“We further found that the increased volume of low-priced subject imports had no significant price effects and coincided with significant improvement in the domestic industry’s condition,” it said.

In their dissenting views, Ms. Schmidtlein and Mr. Williamson wrote, “We find that a significant volume of subject imports from China has undersold the domestic like product, significantly depressed U.S. prices and caused material injury to the domestic industry.”

Ms. Schmidtlein and Mr. Williamson discounted evidence that the domestic industry’s performance improved during the period of investigation.

“The U.S. industry was profitable, and profits grew over the period, but the overall increase was modest considering the significant increase in demand over the investigation period and the opportunity to benefit from lower costs,” they wrote.

The United Steelworkers union petitioned the ITC for antidumping and countervailing duty relief against Chinese truck and bus tire imports in January 2016. Commissioner Dean A. Pinkert did not participate in the investigation. Shortly after the final vote was taken, Mr. Pinkert announced his return to private law practice.

 

According to the ITC, there are seven truck and bus tire plants in the U.S., employing 6,629.

The apparent dollar value of truck and bus tire consumption in 2015 was $6.1 billion, the ITC said.

Chinese imports accounted for $1.2 billion of that total, with $1.3 billion coming from other countries including Canada, Japan and Thailand.

China continued last year as the No. 1 source of imported truck/bus tires, despite shipments falling 14.4 percent, to 7.63 million units. Overall imports were off as well, by 3.8 percent to 13.9 million units. 

Thailand’s truck/bus tire exports to the U.S. jumped 98.7 percent to 1.82 million units, making that nation the No. 2 source of imported truck tires last year.

Canada, Japan and South Korea were third through fifth on the list, with South Korea’s exports to the U.S. growing 85.1 percent to 421,239 units.

Read the source article at Tire Business

ITC decision leaves USW, retreaders reeling

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WASHINGTON (Feb. 24, 2017) — The United Steelworkers (USW) union and U.S. retreaders are reeling in the wake of the U.S. International Trade Commission’s (ITC) decision to not impose import duties on Chinese truck and bus tire imports.

The 3-2 ITC vote on Feb. 20 that the U.S. truck and bus tire industry has not suffered material injury because of Chinese imports means the U.S. Department of Commerce will not order U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect antidumping and countervailing duties from Chinese truck and bus tire manufacturers and importers.

The USW union, which had petitioned the ITC for duties a year ago, expressed disappointment at the agency’s decision, as did represesentatives of the U.S. retreading industry, which supported elevated duties on Chinese truck/bus tires as a way to keep an important price differential between new Chinese tires and retreaded truck tires.

“Of all the stakeholders in this, retreaders are the ones who are hurt the most,” said Terry Westhafer, president of Verona, Va.-based retreading firm Central Tire Co.

Considering the fact that the Commerce Department had issued final antidumping and countervailing duties against Chinese tire makers in late January, Mr. Westhafer said it is hard to understand how the ITC failed to find material injury in this investigation.

Read the source article at Tire Business