Global tire manufacturing output to grow 3.4% year-on-year

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Global tire production in 2019 is estimated to reach 19.25 million tonnes and is anticipated to grow at 3.4% compound annual growth to 22.75 million tonnes by the end of 2024.

Smithers Rapra’s new report, The Future of Tyre Manufacturing to 2024, estimates the global tire industry’s capital spending to be over US$15bn in 2019. Further growth by value will reflect that of production and demand, with an average annual growth of 3.3% through to 2024.

Read the source article at Tire Technology International

A Conversation with Brent Hesje

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Many of the same disruptions that continue to affect the U.S. tire industry are impacting the Canadian tire market. Tire Business Editor Don Detore sat down recently to discuss the market with Fountain Tire CEO Brent Hesje. Fountain Tire has been honored as one of Alberta’s Top Employers and one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Falken targets CUVs for opportunities, growth

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VENCE, France — With sales of crossover utility vehicles (CUVs) surging in North America, Sumitomo Rubber North America Inc. (SRNA) is evolving its Falken-brand tire lineup to serve customers in this segment more effectively.

The aim is to get a step ahead of the competition and offer tires targeted at a market segment that to date, according to Falken, is underserved by the tire industry.

Read the source article at Tire Business

CEAT hires Carlos Acosta as business development manager

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CHARLOTTE, NC — Carlos Acosta has joined CEAT Specialty Tires Inc. as business development manager for Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean.

Read the source article at Tire Business

New technologies improve efficiencies in tire manufacturing: New Smithers Rapra report details key trends

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The need for more automation and faster size changes in tires over the last couple of decades has led to an industry manufacturing transformation. This transformation has changed factory design and driven changes in tire building machines, process equipment and tires themselves. Some changes are the result of regulations, heightened OEM and consumer performance requirements, and new tire materials. These improvements in tire manufacturing and others are detailed in the new Smithers Rapra market report The Future of Tire Manufacturing to 2024.

Improvements in manufacturing processes have been ongoing since the first tire factories and have accelerated over the last decade – spurred by the increased focus on environmental issues. The construction of new factories will help meet growing demand and handle new equipment more easily. Advances in automation have also helped significantly, although there are still significant savings to be realized, as well as increasing environmental regulations with which to comply. These together mean that improvements in manufacturing efficiencies will continue to be a focus for tire companies.

Developments affecting tire plants and manufacturing processes are as diverse as the penetration of new vehicle powertrains, logistical burdens, emergence of new markets, mergers and acquisitions, and the increased value and scarcity of real estate.

Regional developments

Tire demand and industry growth are driving manufacturing expansion at both the regional and global level. Distribution of tire manufacturing capacity and production across the major regions of the world is shaped by local tire demand from OEM and replacement market customers and favorable costs of the production factors.

Tire manufacturers tend to establish local factories in their most important sales areas, most recently focusing on Asia, according to The Future of Tire Manufacturing to 2024. The reverse is also happening with Asian producers setting up production close to customers they consider important, such as US-based OEMs. For this reason North American tire manufacturing is showing growth while the mature European market with lose share over the coming five years. Raw material prices are very similar all over the world, but labor and energy costs vary by region or country.

Tire demand drives manufacturing

Global tire demand is the ultimate driver of tire manufacturing, with both vehicles in use generating ongoing tire wear and replacement needs, and new vehicle sales requiring OEM tires to be fitted. Overall global tire demand is expected to grow 4% per year in unit terms in 2019-24.

The global tire industry as measured by tonnage of production is estimated to be 19.25 million tons in 2019, and is anticipated to grow at a 3.4% compound annual growth rate through 2024, to 22.75 million tons.

 

This growth is being driven and shaped by a variety of economic, technology and regulatory, demographic and consumer trends at the global, regional and national level, including alternative powertrains and autonomous vehicles, improvement in materials including sustainable substitutes and changing customer requirements like greater fuel efficiency with reduced emissions. There is a continuing high-performance trend towards larger OEM tire sizes/rim diameters, as well as ongoing pressure on automakers to meet emissions and fuel economy standards for individual vehicles as well as fleets, while tire companies adapt to consumer labelling schemes in Europe and increasingly, elsewhere.

Influence of vehicle mix and design

Trends in both conventional and emerging segments of motor vehicles have a critical influence on tires requirements and manufacturing, requiring a lot of planning and flexibility. For instance, a continuing shift towards light trucks away from passenger cars in developed markets coexists with growth in developing markets in entry level vehicle segments. The shifts at the OEM level have been underway for years, as seen by the continuing high growth of higher performance vehicles as well as eco-friendly vehicles and fleets.

Changes in tire types and design

A tire’s key required or desirable characteristics include safety, reliability, wet and dry traction, snow performance/wet performance, handling, high rolling efficiency, noise and life (miles)/longevity. New tire developments are constantly occurring, and there are substantial changes every year. Tire attributes in flux include tread/shape, material types and material chemistry, among others, and that does not even include the many concept tires.

Tire makers have made their primary commitment to produce ever more technically advanced tires (e.g. with sensors to measure tread depth, temperature and provide real-time alerts to drivers), run-flat tires including self-sealing tires, self-inflating tires, air-free tire  technologies, and reduced noise or noise-dampening tire technology (important for quiet electric vehicles).

Technology impact on tire manufacturing to produce these technically advance tires includes new molds, laser carving tools, new test equipment (especially for noise), as well as material changes such as different resins, silicas, and aramid fiber.

EV tire requirements

Use of electric vehicles (EVs) is on the rise and one obvious effect of the uptake of electric powertrains is the increased complexity of tire varieties. This includes the further SKU (stocking unit) proliferation from increased variation in OE tire types and sizes. Tire wear concerns with EVs make higher wear resistance critical, since traditional tires wear 30% faster on EVs than on conventional vehicles.

EV tires require optimized footprint shape and contact pressure distribution to avoid irregular wear. Maximizing battery range requires continued reduction of rolling resistance, and the additional weight of EVs may require even lighter weight tires. Quiet electric vehicles require emphasis on noise reduction on top of existing pressure from labeling schemes.

AV tire evolution

Many EV tire changes also apply to autonomous vehicles (likely to be all or mostly electric), but the introduction and spread of autonomous driving means that further changes are emerging and will have to be scaled up alongside more traditional manufacturing.

Tire sensing and communication capabilities are emerging at OE and aftermarket levels. Various types of tire condition and wear sensors and intelligent tires are in development, with some approaching market readiness in advance of the big future shift to autonomous vehicles.

Autonomous self-steering cars will mean that tire-vehicle communication becomes more important meaning tire sensors will be needed. Connected tires will contribute to road sensing, vehicle operation, and predictive maintenance (wear/damage sensing).

Emphasis on low noise and high ride quality will increase. Reliability requirements may be higher, increasing potential market for run-flat tires and eventual non-pneumatics. As AVs become the norm, the light vehicle tire may characterized by their tall and skinny shape (for aerodynamics and other attributes), sensor technology, no speed rating (driving speeds will be programmed and limited), better ride and less NVH (noise, vibration and harshness), ultra low rolling resistance (improving fuel economy), possible run-flat technology (if it can be lightweight enough) and labeling for compatibility.

For more information about the Smithers Rapra market report “The Future of Tire Manufacturing”, visit: https://www.smithersrapra.com/market-reports/tire-industry-market-reports/the-future-of-tire-manufacturing-to-2024

Janine Young is a career b2b communications professional with a background in trade journalism, corporate communications and public relations. She is a member of the Smithers Rapra reports and consultancy team that publishes market reports for members of the tire and rubber industries. She is editor of the Smithers Report, a subscription news service that focuses on tire and rubber industry trends and technology.

Read the source article at smithersrapra.com

Making the sustainable tire possible

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Sustainability and the circular economy. These two ideas are the focus of both global corporations and the media. Consumption of resources and the one-time use of tires pose a huge environmental challenge.

Millions of tires are cast off in landfills, and this global issue continues to grow daily. Compounding issues, tire companies today are forced to use only virgin rubber to create new tires.

Read the source article at Rubber and Plastics News

Tire industry should embrace disruption, innovation

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HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. —Disruption is now almost a daily event in the tire industry, according to Dave Zielasko, publisher of Tire Business.

But disruption is good for business as long as you’re prepared to face it, Mr. Zielasko said in his presentation at the 35th Clemson University Global Tire Industry Conference, held April 10-12 in Hilton Head Island.

“Disruption can be an opportunity,” he said. “You need to embrace innovation and the turbulence that comes with it.”

Read the source article at Tire Business

Advanced vehicle technology shaking up tire industry

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HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. — Advanced vehicle technology is coming fast, and it will have a major impact on tire technology as well, according to speakers at the 35th Clemson University Global Tire Industry Conference at Hilton Head, held April 10-12.

Keynote speaker Chris Helsel, chief technology officer at Goodyear, noted that vehicle technology has undergone radical changes periodically throughout history.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Bill Sweatman Retires from Marangoni, Succeeded by Clif Armstrong

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After more than 18 years with Marangoni, 16 of those as president/CEO, Bill Sweatman has announced his retirement effective May 1.

Sweatman joined Marangoni shortly after it was formed in 1998 by Jack Woodland in Walnut Creek California.

Bill explained, “I started in the tire industry in 1977 and the retreading industry in 1984.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Merger/acquisition activity continues to drive North American commercial sector

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AKRON — 2018/19 will go down as one of the commercial tire industry’s most active periods in terms of mergers/acquisitions, with as many as 75 points of sale/service and 14 retread plants changing hands over the past 12 months.

Topping the list are Southern Tire Mart’s pending acquisition of 46 GCR Tires & Service commercial tire locations and six retread plants from Bridgestone Americas Inc. and Bauer Built Inc.’s acquisition of the tire division of Allied Oil & Tire Co. — seven outlets and one retread plant in five states.

Read the source article at Tire Business