Rubber-modified asphalt a key growth area for tire recycling

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Washington – Tire-derived fuel and rubber-modified asphalt are the key growth areas in tire recycling, according to John Sheerin, director, end-of-life tire programs, at the US Tire Manufacturers Association.

But the paths of TDF and rubberised asphalt to market dominance haven’t exactly been straightforward, Sheerin said in an interview connected with the July 18 release of the USTMA’s 2017 Scrap Tire Report, which records progress in scrap tire abatement and end-use up to…

Read the source article at European Rubber Journal

Enviro studying production of fuel from recycled tires

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Stockholm – A joint project run by Research Institute of Sweden (RISE), together with tire recycler Scandinavian Enviro Systems and waste management group Ragn-Sells is studying the possibility of producing pyrolysis oil from worn out tires.

The aim of the study is to evaluate three different approaches for upgrading pyrolysis oil from tires to make more high-quality fuel products, said Enviro in a 5 June statement.

Read the source article at European Rubber Journal

What to expect at the ‘Scrap to Profit’ conference

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Innovation to drive new and improved scrap tire markets is a key theme for the 7th Scrap to Profit Conference scheduled for October 25-26, 2017 at The Inn at Opryland Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee.

Topics to be discussed will be non-commercial and include market discussions of tire derived fuel, civil engineering, and ground rubber markets. Also, research and education needs for new markets and recent innovations in scrap tire uses will be addressed.

Read the source article at Traction News

Tyre Derived Fuel reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Australia

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A new report prepared for Australian Tyre Recyclers Association (ATRA), “Carbon Value Proposition, Resource Recovery using Tyre Derived Fuels”, states that replacing one tonne of black coal with one tonne of TDF can save emissions of up to 1.05 tonnes of CO2-e into the atmosphere.

“This is good news for the environment when you consider the majority of used passenger and truck tyres in Australia are converted into a TDF and exported to high-end industrial facilities such as cement kilns and paper manufacturing plants in Japan and South Korea,” says ATRA Executive Officer Robert Kelman, adding:

“We could be using this fuel here and banking the greenhouse gas savings in Australia, after all there is no shortage of used passenger and truck tyres. The extremely high calorific value of TDF, makes it an attractive alternative fuel on an international scale and may ultimately be eligible domestically for energy efficiency or low emission credits”.

“Tyre-derived fuels address a challenging waste problem as well as providing a low carbon fuel at a cheaper rate than coal, even in Australia,” Jim Fairweather, CEO of Australia’s leading tyre recycler, Tyrecycle observed, continuing: “ATRA members export around 145,000 tonnes of TDF per year, which could increase further if a domestic market was established and greater access was given to tyres on mining sites and other tyre stockpiles”.

Read the source article at Tyrepress