Tire & Rubber Summit 2019: Suppliers ready to overcome tire industry challenges

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TORONTO—Raw material suppliers face various challenges in providing tire makers with the quality and quantity of materials they need. But they are more than prepared to meet those challenges.

This was the message representatives from three raw materials sectors—carbon black, natural rubber and synthetic rubber—had for attendees at “Driving to the Future,” the 2019 Tire & Rubber Summit sponsored by the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada.

Read the source article at Rubber and Plastics News

Jury still out on new Canadian scrap tire program

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C.—Extended producer responsibility for scrap tires is here to stay, according to Glenn Maidment, president of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC).

But the jury is still out on individual producer responsibility (IPR), Mr. Maidment told his audience at the 35th Clemson University Global Tire Industry Conference, held recently in Hilton Head.

Under a directive from the Waste-Free Ontario Act of 2015, tire manufacturers and importers in Ontario officially closed out Ontario Tire Stewardship (OTS), their industry-funded recycling organization, in January 2019.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Future Tire: Simple things make a difference

London – The single most effective improvement that can make tires more sustainable today is enhancing air-retention, according to ExxonMobil Chemical.

“When we think of sustainability we shouldn’t just focus on things that make great headlines or very long term goals,” said a company spokesman in a Q&A ahead of the Future Tire Conference 2019, in June.

Read the source article at European Rubber Journal

Increasing Profitability of Tire Recycling Businesses with Innovative Rubber Products

Recycling tires into materials such as steel-free crumb rubber and fine rubber powder used to be a profitable venture; however, due to market saturation in developed economies, tire recycling companies might want to shift their focus from raw materials to potentially higher-priced consumer goods made from recycled rubber or even virgin rubber which can be replaced by tire-derived materials. The first and so far one of the most viable choices of tire recyclers would be investing in presses and molds to produce molded goods from crumb rubber or rubber powder. Another options include more complex technologies, e.g. blending recycled rubber powder with polyethylene or polypropylene to produce thermoplastic elastomers (TPE).

 

Read the source article at weibold.com

Run-Flat Tires: How Do They Work?

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Run-flat tires feature advanced designs that reinforce the tire in some way so that you can continue to drive on them and find a repair station in the event of a puncture or leak. Although they can’t be driven on for too long, when driven at a maximum of 50 mph most run-flats give drivers an extra 50-100 miles to safely get to an auto repair or tire shop.

There are currently two main types of run-flat tires; those that use a support ring system and those that use a self-supporting system.

Read the source article at actiongatortire.com

The balancing act: tires and electric vehicles

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Tires all look alike. But to get the best out of an EV, tire makers have developed a whole new category of tires. Michal Majernik of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada explains this evolving industry.

A new breed of car has hit the roads. EVs are here to stay, and it does not come as a surprise that EV tire requirements differ from the mainstream car tires for internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. While it is true that traditional passenger tires can be installed on an EV, the EV tire segment is evolving. How are EV tires designed? The core considerations taken into account are…

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Read the source article at Home – Auto-Innov

New technologies improve efficiencies in tire manufacturing: New Smithers Rapra report details key trends

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The need for more automation and faster size changes in tires over the last couple of decades has led to an industry manufacturing transformation. This transformation has changed factory design and driven changes in tire building machines, process equipment and tires themselves. Some changes are the result of regulations, heightened OEM and consumer performance requirements, and new tire materials. These improvements in tire manufacturing and others are detailed in the new Smithers Rapra market report The Future of Tire Manufacturing to 2024.

Improvements in manufacturing processes have been ongoing since the first tire factories and have accelerated over the last decade – spurred by the increased focus on environmental issues. The construction of new factories will help meet growing demand and handle new equipment more easily. Advances in automation have also helped significantly, although there are still significant savings to be realized, as well as increasing environmental regulations with which to comply. These together mean that improvements in manufacturing efficiencies will continue to be a focus for tire companies.

Developments affecting tire plants and manufacturing processes are as diverse as the penetration of new vehicle powertrains, logistical burdens, emergence of new markets, mergers and acquisitions, and the increased value and scarcity of real estate.

Regional developments

Tire demand and industry growth are driving manufacturing expansion at both the regional and global level. Distribution of tire manufacturing capacity and production across the major regions of the world is shaped by local tire demand from OEM and replacement market customers and favorable costs of the production factors.

Tire manufacturers tend to establish local factories in their most important sales areas, most recently focusing on Asia, according to The Future of Tire Manufacturing to 2024. The reverse is also happening with Asian producers setting up production close to customers they consider important, such as US-based OEMs. For this reason North American tire manufacturing is showing growth while the mature European market with lose share over the coming five years. Raw material prices are very similar all over the world, but labor and energy costs vary by region or country.

Tire demand drives manufacturing

Global tire demand is the ultimate driver of tire manufacturing, with both vehicles in use generating ongoing tire wear and replacement needs, and new vehicle sales requiring OEM tires to be fitted. Overall global tire demand is expected to grow 4% per year in unit terms in 2019-24.

The global tire industry as measured by tonnage of production is estimated to be 19.25 million tons in 2019, and is anticipated to grow at a 3.4% compound annual growth rate through 2024, to 22.75 million tons.

 

This growth is being driven and shaped by a variety of economic, technology and regulatory, demographic and consumer trends at the global, regional and national level, including alternative powertrains and autonomous vehicles, improvement in materials including sustainable substitutes and changing customer requirements like greater fuel efficiency with reduced emissions. There is a continuing high-performance trend towards larger OEM tire sizes/rim diameters, as well as ongoing pressure on automakers to meet emissions and fuel economy standards for individual vehicles as well as fleets, while tire companies adapt to consumer labelling schemes in Europe and increasingly, elsewhere.

Influence of vehicle mix and design

Trends in both conventional and emerging segments of motor vehicles have a critical influence on tires requirements and manufacturing, requiring a lot of planning and flexibility. For instance, a continuing shift towards light trucks away from passenger cars in developed markets coexists with growth in developing markets in entry level vehicle segments. The shifts at the OEM level have been underway for years, as seen by the continuing high growth of higher performance vehicles as well as eco-friendly vehicles and fleets.

Changes in tire types and design

A tire’s key required or desirable characteristics include safety, reliability, wet and dry traction, snow performance/wet performance, handling, high rolling efficiency, noise and life (miles)/longevity. New tire developments are constantly occurring, and there are substantial changes every year. Tire attributes in flux include tread/shape, material types and material chemistry, among others, and that does not even include the many concept tires.

Tire makers have made their primary commitment to produce ever more technically advanced tires (e.g. with sensors to measure tread depth, temperature and provide real-time alerts to drivers), run-flat tires including self-sealing tires, self-inflating tires, air-free tire  technologies, and reduced noise or noise-dampening tire technology (important for quiet electric vehicles).

Technology impact on tire manufacturing to produce these technically advance tires includes new molds, laser carving tools, new test equipment (especially for noise), as well as material changes such as different resins, silicas, and aramid fiber.

EV tire requirements

Use of electric vehicles (EVs) is on the rise and one obvious effect of the uptake of electric powertrains is the increased complexity of tire varieties. This includes the further SKU (stocking unit) proliferation from increased variation in OE tire types and sizes. Tire wear concerns with EVs make higher wear resistance critical, since traditional tires wear 30% faster on EVs than on conventional vehicles.

EV tires require optimized footprint shape and contact pressure distribution to avoid irregular wear. Maximizing battery range requires continued reduction of rolling resistance, and the additional weight of EVs may require even lighter weight tires. Quiet electric vehicles require emphasis on noise reduction on top of existing pressure from labeling schemes.

AV tire evolution

Many EV tire changes also apply to autonomous vehicles (likely to be all or mostly electric), but the introduction and spread of autonomous driving means that further changes are emerging and will have to be scaled up alongside more traditional manufacturing.

Tire sensing and communication capabilities are emerging at OE and aftermarket levels. Various types of tire condition and wear sensors and intelligent tires are in development, with some approaching market readiness in advance of the big future shift to autonomous vehicles.

Autonomous self-steering cars will mean that tire-vehicle communication becomes more important meaning tire sensors will be needed. Connected tires will contribute to road sensing, vehicle operation, and predictive maintenance (wear/damage sensing).

Emphasis on low noise and high ride quality will increase. Reliability requirements may be higher, increasing potential market for run-flat tires and eventual non-pneumatics. As AVs become the norm, the light vehicle tire may characterized by their tall and skinny shape (for aerodynamics and other attributes), sensor technology, no speed rating (driving speeds will be programmed and limited), better ride and less NVH (noise, vibration and harshness), ultra low rolling resistance (improving fuel economy), possible run-flat technology (if it can be lightweight enough) and labeling for compatibility.

For more information about the Smithers Rapra market report “The Future of Tire Manufacturing”, visit: https://www.smithersrapra.com/market-reports/tire-industry-market-reports/the-future-of-tire-manufacturing-to-2024

Janine Young is a career b2b communications professional with a background in trade journalism, corporate communications and public relations. She is a member of the Smithers Rapra reports and consultancy team that publishes market reports for members of the tire and rubber industries. She is editor of the Smithers Report, a subscription news service that focuses on tire and rubber industry trends and technology.

Read the source article at smithersrapra.com

Global and China Natural Rubber Industry Report, 2019-2025

NEW YORK, May 21, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — In 2018, global natural rubber industry continued remained at low ebb, as a result of economic fundamentals. Global natural rubber price presented a choppy downtrend and repeatedly hit a record low in recent two years, in spite of an uptick in the…

Read the source article at PR Newswire

Save at the pump, measure tire inflation monthly

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Cambridge, May 13, 2019 – Surging gas prices have made fuel efficiency a higher priority for Canadian drivers, according to a new national survey conducted by Leger in mid-April for the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC).

Nine-in-ten drivers surveyed (92 per cent) say fuel economy is now a higher priority for them and 90 per cent understand that proper tire inflation maximizes mileage and reduces fuel costs.

Read the source article at Be Tire Smart

It’s Time to Plan Your Trip to the Tire & Rubber Summit 2019

Join us at the Tire & Rubber Summit 2019 on June 11 and 12 in Toronto, and don’t forget to take advantage of our preferred hotel rate at the event’s Toronto Airport Marriott Hotel.

Our group rate offer will expire on Tuesday, May 21, so take advantage and register prior to this date here: Book hotel (special event rate). If you prefer a phone reservation where you can speak to a live person, please call hotel reservations toll free: 1-800-905-2811 or 1-888-236-2427.

This year’s iteration of the Tire & Rubber Summit is all about technology. Our 2019 program brings you a list of relevant industry topics delivered by high-profile executive speakers from rubber companies, non-tire manufacturers, rubber compounders, suppliers, auxiliary businesses, and regulators.

Register now and find out all there is to know about the broad range of new disruptive technologies in automotive, manufacturing and materials development sectors, rubber material feedstocks, regulatory initiatives and outlook, and Canadian economic outlook.

Download Program

REGISTER NOW! 

 

Read the source article at Eventbrite