OTR tire conference to feature wide array of speakers

Author Steve Gilliland will discuss how the conscious choices people make every day impact the lives of others during a motivational speech on the final day of the 2020 Off-the-Road Tire Conference, presented by the Tire Industry Association (TIA). …

The program on Feb. 20 will begin with U.S. and Canadian Economic Forecasts presented by TIA’s Kevin Rohlwing, senior vice president of training, and Glenn Maidment, president of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada. An End-User Panel will follow, moderated by Modern Tire Dealer Publisher Greg Smith. Panelists include Robert Smart, procurement category manager, mobile equipment, Martin Marietta, and Lonnie Sullivan, strategic sourcing manager, mobile equipment, Vulcan Materials Co.

 

Read the source article at Auto Service World

Tire Industry Mourns the Passing of Brian James

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Brian James, former President of the Tire and Rubber Association (1985-1996) and lifetime industry professional and executive at Dunlop, passed away on February 3, 2020 at the age of 90. His career, spanning over four decades, took him around the world and made him an influential force in the industry globally, and a key figure and dedicated champion of the tire industry in Canada and North America.

“Brian was a mentor and a friend to me personally and to many in the industry. He had uncanny ability to bring people together and share knowledge and ideas for the betterment of our industry and he was always keen to share fascinating and interesting stories from his lifetime in the industry. Brian made a number of important contributions to the Canadian rubber industry, particularly during the original Free Trade Agreement negotiations, where he and a few other key players negotiated a ten-year phase-out of tariffs in an effort to help domestic producers adjust to open borders. During that same period, he helped negotiate a duty remission program with the Feds that ultimately garnered close to a billion dollars of new investment in Canada, which is essentially why we still have a vibrant tire industry in Canada today. He will be sorely missed by many.” Says Glenn Maidment, President of the Tire and Rubber Association. 

A visitation will be held at Kopriva Taylor Funeral Home, 64 Lakeshore Road West, Oakville on Sunday, February 9, 2020 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. Funeral service will take place on Monday, February 10, 2020 at 2 pm at Grace Church-on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Road, Toronto, followed by a reception.

Natural Resources Lifted By Trade, Growth Optimism

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Commodities and natural resource equities faced a number of headwinds leading up to October as fears around slowing growth in China and a strong U.S. dollar created less than ideal conditions for the space. As the quarter progressed, these were joined by concerns around Brexit […]

Read the source article at Global Rubber Markets News

Evolution of all-season and winter tire technologies outlined in new report from Smithers

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Important trends and technologies in all-season and winter tires are detailed in a market report recently released by Smithers. All-Season vs Winter Tires to 2024: A State-of-the-Art Report (Members of TRAC receive 15 per cent discount on all rubber industry market reports produced by Smithers) assesses the key technologies, materials and market drivers that enable tire performance in these two critical product segments, including regulatory, end-use (passenger cars and light trucks) and regional outlooks. 

In terms of performance, several technologies account for the differences in all-season vs. winter tires, including materials, physical design, noise control technologies, processing, and modeling/simulation.

These technologies are ranked and detailed in the state-of-the-art report.

Region differences

The large temperate climate regions of the US and China make all-season tires a standard for most areas except for the northern most regions. Even in many of those areas, and in parts of southern Canada, all-season tires have a high market share, and season-specific tires are less important. This is in contrast to regulatory requirements in Europe and in severe winter weather provinces in Canada where laws or incentives have led to the market bifurcation between summer tires and winter tires.

The role of fuel economy standards

The most important regulatory driver for all-season tires is the OEM vehicle fuel economy standards. These standards are increasing for vehicle OEMs in the EU, Japan, China and North America. Targets for the EU and Japan in the 2025 time frame are rising to over 60 mpg. Originally, US CAFE standards were scheduled to increase to 54.5 mpg in 2025 for passenger cars and 47 mpg as a fleet average, but the standards have been revised downward to 44 mpg and 47 mpg as a fleet average.

The US vehicle market is moving dramatically toward fewer fuel-efficient SUVs/light trucks, which now make up 55% of light duty vehicle sales, even though the US has fuel economy improvements to make to reach new targets. Because tires contribute directly to vehicle fuel economy, automakers will prioritize low-rolling resistance all-season tires in the US for fuel economy gains. In other regions, higher fuel economy standards will drive toward super low-rolling resistance tires.

Winter tire regulation

Europe leads in winter tire regulation, with Germany’s winter tire mandate leading the way. Other EU countries have their own regulations, but because travel among countries is prolific, most consumers use winter tires. In North America, the US does not have a winter tire regulation, and demand for winter tires is concentrated in the northern states. Only in Quebec, Canada, are strict winter tire requirements mandated.

In Asia, Japan’s winter liability laws have encouraged extensive winter tire adoption, while no regulation exists in China. Winter tires are designated by the Alpine snowflake 3MPSF and M+S designations. Winter tire performance is segmented between Nordic/high snow and ice conditions and more moderate Central European winter conditions.  

All-weather tires

All-weather tires are a new market development gaining interest in Europe; they have also been introduced in North America. They offer winter tire labelling with the Alpine snowflake 3MPSF and year-round performance. Market potential exists to expand the all-weather/four-season tire category in south Central Europe, the northern US, Japan and eventually China.

Climate change

Climate patterns over the past 50 years have shown increasing temperatures. This is especially important for the future of winter tires and, to some extent, all-season tires. Increasing temperatures have been significant in northern climates, such as the northern US, where the average temperature has increased over 5° Fahrenheit, putting more cities in moderate winter vs. severe winter climates. The temperature change has generally led to decreases in snowfall and increases in rain; these trends are projected to accelerate over time.  

The overall long-term trends mean winter tires will need to focus more on wet grip, grip on black ice films, and wet snow performance around freezing instead of heavy and dry snow with thick ice conditions at temperatures significantly below freezing.

A brochure on the All-Season vs Winter Tires to 2024: A State-of-the-Art Report is available at: https://www.smithers.com/services/market-reports/transportation/all-season-vs-winter-tires-to-2024.

Read the source article at Smithers

Lehigh U., Michelin to study soft materials friction with NSF grant

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BETHLEHEM, Pa. — The National Science Foundation has granted Lehigh University nearly $2 million in funding over five years to work with Michelin North America and Cornell University to develop “novel” mechanisms to improve the friction of soft materials.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Tire Technology Expo Conference program: More speakers added!

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Tire Technology Expo Conference has just released an updated conference program, featuring even more new speakers. With over 170 presentations in total across 12 dedicated streams, leading organizations set to speak at the event include Bridgestone, Continental, Ducati, ExxonMobil, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Hankook, Jaguar Land Rover, Lamborghini, Michelin, Pirelli, and Yokohoma.

Read the source article at Tire Technology International

TRAC’s New Video Series Will Teach Drivers About All Things Tire

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TRAC and our consumer education initiative Be Tire Smart Canada launch a new video series that will continue to educate Canadian drivers about all things tire. We are creating these videos to guide drivers through the entire tire ownership and user journey, and underscoring the importance of tire maintenance and how it relates to safe driving.

Our goal is to encourage Canadian motorists to adopt good tire maintenance practices that will maximize the life span of tires, increase fuel efficiency, and keep our roads safer.

Our first two videos (available in English and French) educate drivers about tire options for winter driving, and the advantages of winter tires on cold Canadian roads.

Read the source article at Be Tire Smart

Eight-in-ten winter tire owners say winter tires have saved them from a hazardous situation: survey

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Cambridge, Ontario, Nov. 12, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Eighty per cent of winter tire owners believe driving a vehicle equipped with winter tires has saved them from loss of control or a collision, according to a new Leger survey commissioned by the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC) www.tracanada.ca.

Read the source article at finance.yahoo.com

Are winter tires worth the investment?

Every winter, my brother-in-law teases me for putting winter tires on our two SUVs. He says they’re a cash grab and aren’t necessary with all-wheel drive. He thinks that if winter tires really made a difference, they’d be required by law. – Jamal, Edmonton Winter tires aren’t just for snowflakes. If you live anywhere in Canada with snow and ice, which is almost everywhere, they’re better than all-seasons at keeping you from sliding into the ditch. “Should most Canadians be using winter tires?

Read the source article at Home – The Globe and Mail

Want to save money on auto insurance? Buy winter tires, say experts

If you drive in winter, there’s a lot riding on your tires. With the wrong rubber on cold, wet, snowy or icy roads, you’re not only risking life and limb, you’re playing with financial fire, say automotive experts. …

Michael Majernik, communications manager for the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC), agrees all-weathers, introduced a decade ago, may be a good compromise “for year-round usage with a winter edge.” But a set of four dedicated winter tires is the safest and best performer in the season’s worst weather, the experts agree.

 

 

 

Read the source article at thestar.com