Recycled rubber infill causes a very low level of concern

ECHA has evaluated the risk of substances in recycled rubber that is used on artificial sports pitches. Based on the evidence, ECHA has concluded that the concern for players on these pitches, including children, and for workers who install and maintain them is very low. ECHA will update its evaluation as and when new information becomes available.

Helsinki, 28 February 2017 – In June 2016, the European Commission asked ECHA to evaluate the risk to the general population, including children, professional players and workers installing or maintaining the pitches.

A number of hazardous substances are present in recycled rubber granules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, phthalates, volatile organic hydrocarbons (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic hydrocarbons (SVOCs). Exposure to these substances through skin contact, ingestion and inhalation was considered.

Based on the information available, ECHA concludes that there is, at most, a very low level of concern from exposure to recycled rubber granules:

  • The concern for lifetime cancer risk is very low given the concentrations of PAHs typically measured in European sports grounds.
  • The concern from metals is negligible given that the data indicated that the levels are below the limits allowed in the current toys legislation.
  • No concerns were identified from the concentrations of phthalates, benzothiazole and methyl isobutyl ketone as these are below the concentrations that would lead to health problems.
  • It has been reported that volatile organic compounds emitted from rubber granules in indoor halls might cause irritation to the eyes and skin.

Read the source article at Homepage

Study: Rubber turf doesn’t raise cancer risk

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OLYMPIA, Wash. (Feb. 10, 2017)— A newly issued analysis from the Washington State Department of Health (WSDOH) concluded there is no evidence that cancer rates among young athletes are increased by playing on crumb rubber athletic turf.

“We did not find the number of cancers among soccer players, select and premier players or goalkeepers reported to the project team to be higher than expected based on Washington cancer rates for people of the same ages,” said the executive summary of the analysis from the WSDOH.

A coalition of three synthetic turf associations — the Recycled Rubber Council (RRC), the Safe Fields Alliance and the Synthetic Turf Council — said they were pleased but not surprised by the results of the WSDOH analysis.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Crumb Rubber Athletic Turf — Health Department Analysis Finds No Cancer Link

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OLYMPIA, Wash.—A newly issued analysis from the Washington State Department of Health concluded there is no evidence that cancer rates among young athletes are increased by playing on crumb rubber athletic turf.

“We did not find the number of cancers among soccer players, select and premier players or goalkeepers reported to the project team to be higher than expected based on Washington cancer rates for people of the same ages,” said the executive summary of the analysis from the WSDOH.

A coalition of three synthetic turf associations—the Recycled Rubber Council, the Safe Fields Alliance and the Synthetic Turf Council—said they were pleased but not surprised by the results of the WSDOH analysis.

“The findings address an area of uncertainty and lend further credence to the many available scientific analyses on the subject with consistent conclusions,” said Michael Peterson, scientific adviser to the RRC. “The best evidence indicates there are no safety risks associated with chemicals found in recycled rubber infill.”

Read the source article at home.rubbernews.com

Study finds no increased rate of cancer among soccer players

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An investigation into a suspected cancer cluster among soccer players in Washington state found fewer than expected cases in the 5 to 24 age group, casting doubt on a theory that playing on artificial turf fields could increase the risk for cancer.

Officials from the Washington State Department of Health and the University of Washington School of Public Health launched the study after a coach for the UW women’s soccer team compiled a list of some 30 soccer players in the state who had been diagnosed with cancer, primarily Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, from the mid-1990s to 2015. The coach was particularly concerned about the number of goalkeepers with cancer and floated a theory that exposure to bits of recycled rubber used as infill in synthetic fields might be the cause. The list was later expanded to include more than 50 individuals with cancer, including some nonsoccer players who exercised on synthetic fields.

“We found that the number of cancers among all soccer players reported by the coach was less than expected, given rates of cancer in Washington residents of similar age,” said Dr. Cathy Wasserman, state epidemiologist for non-infectious conditions and lead investigator for the study.

The analysis calculated that given the number of soccer players in the state and the rate of cancer in the 5- to 24-year-old age group in the state, some 1,384 soccer players would develop cancer if there were no increased risk from synthetic turfs.

The finding suggests that the cancers reported by the coach, on its own, does not support a link between playing soccer and cancer. That was also true for goalkeepers and for players competing at higher levels, known as select or premier players.

Read the source article at bendbulletin.com

Dutch study: artificial turf with rubber crumbs safe

THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS—A Dutch government public health organization said Tuesday it is safe to play soccer and other sports on artificial turf fields covered in rubber crumbs, following an investigation triggered by fears over dangerous chemicals in the granules.

The National Institute for Public Health and the Environment published a report saying that the health risk from playing on such fields, which are common throughout the Netherlands and elsewhere as low-maintenance alternatives to natural grass, is “virtually negligible.”

Read the source article at thestar.com

Register Now for the Premiere Rubber recycling Event: October 5-7

The Rubber Recycling Symposium will once again draw an international audience to exchange ideas and discover the latest in the rubber and tire recycling technologies, products, and policies.

Created and organized by Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (www.tracanada.ca), and co-sponsored by Ontario Tire Stewardship and the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA), the Symposium will take place in Niagara Falls on October 5-7, and bring together tire manufacturers, processors, transporters, equipment manufacturers, stewardship organizations, government and academia.

This year’s event drives toward the latest advances in achieving the circular economy in the rubber and tire industries, and the event program includes topics from global legislative trends to the industry’s conversation on the significance of new initiatives and technologies that drive innovation and create high-value products.

Symposium highlights

Global Overview
The leading industry experts from Canada and U.S. will discuss the challenges and trends in global legislative and regulatory environments, and will focus the conversation on regulations that promote tire recycling and innovative ideas that drive the circular economy.

In Focus: Remaking of the Ontario Tire Recycling Program
With the tire diversion rate at 93 per cent, Canada is one of the global leaders in tire and rubber recycling; however, the new Waste-Free Ontario Act will see the Ontario Tire Stewardship program wind-up and be replaced by something new.

Science and Technology
Tire manufacturers will discuss the global Tire Industry Project (TIP), the significance of the guayule plant as a viable alternative source of latex for the tire industry, and the segment on synthetic turf will discuss the alleged carcinogenic controversy and new research in this important area.

The Holy Grail of rubber recycling – tires made from 100 per cent recycled rubber – may still be out of reach, but the panel including AirBoss, Tyromer and others will show how the industry continues to lower its environmental impact using efficient tire technologies and introduction of recycled materials in tire production.

By popular demand, the event will conclude with CEO panel from major tire processors on challenges, opportunities and outlook, sharing their unique perspectives on tire recycling markets.

Join the conversation on October 5-7, in Niagara Falls, meet all the key industry players, learn and contribute your solutions to the tire and rubber recycling industry.

Visit event details here, and register for this unique event.

Federal Research on Recycled Tire Crumb Used on Playing Fields

Concerns have been raised by the public about the safety of recycled tire crumb used in playing fields and playgrounds in the United States. Limited studies have not shown an elevated health risk from playing on fields with tire crumb, but the existing studies do not comprehensively evaluate the concerns about health risks from exposure to tire crumb.

Federal Research

On February 12, 2016 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) launched a multi-agency action plan to study key environmental human health questions.

Research Protocol Collections Related to Synthetic Turf Fields with Crumb Rubber Infill

Read the source article at US Environmental Protection Agency