Doublestar to build smart rubber recycling plant

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ZHUMADIAN, China – China’s tire maker Doublestar broke ground on its smart plant for scrap rubber recycling in Zhumadian in December, the company said.

Read the source article at Rubber and Plastics News

Emmie Leung Named One of Canada’s Most Powerful

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Over the past 40 years, Emmie Leung, Founder and CEO of Emterra Group, has led her company from a fledging, one-woman start-up, to a widely recognized and regarded leader in waste recycling and resource management. During the Women’s Executive Network’s (WXN) Awards in Toronto, Emmie was named one of Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Winners in the category of Entrepreneurs.  

In the Women’s Executive Network’s announcement, Sherri Stevens, President & CEO of PhaseNyne (parent company of Women’s Executive Network – WXN) stated, “The Top 100 Awards showcases the leaders that are helping to drive positive change and progress and to remind us of the importance of empowering women in our workforce.”

“This award program recognizes women who have pushed the boundaries and are in a constant pursuit of leadership excellence,” said Emmie. “It is a complete honor to be included with this group of exemplary people and to be recognized as one of Canada’s Most Powerful Women.”  

Read the source article at Waste Management Canada

TIP study concludes tire particles safe for human beings

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San Francisco, California – Tire and road wear particles (TRWP) do not pose a threat to human health, according to findings released by the Tire Industry Project (TIP) during its biennial meeting in San Francisco  on 17 Nov.

TIP, which is backed by leading tire makers and operates under the umbrella of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), said extensive ambient air testing had been carried out in major cities of Los Angeles, London, Tokyo and Delhi.

Read the source article at European Rubber Journal

Michelin Acquires Lehigh Technologies, a Specialty Materials Company

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GREENVILLE, S.C.Oct. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Michelin today announced that it has acquired Lehigh Technologies, a specialty materials company that uses patented cryogenic turbo mill technology to transform rubber from end-of-life tires and industrial goods into materials for new tires and other products, reducing the amount of raw materials initially needed, such as elastomers and fillers from oil- and rubber-based sources.

“We are always looking for ways to achieve safer and more sustainable mobility, including by using high-technology recycled materials, without compromising safety or other performances, while consuming less of the natural resources that are available in finite stocks,” said Pete Selleck, chairman and president of Michelin North America. “

Read the source article at PR Newswire

Liberty Tire Recycling Appoints Thomas Womble as CEO, Prepares for Next Phase of Company’s Growth

PITTSBURGHAug. 28, 2017  /PRNewswire/ — Liberty Tire Recycling, the premier provider of tire recycling services in North America, today appointed Thomas Womble, a company veteran, to serve as chief executive officer. Womble has been with Liberty Tire since 2001 and previously served as Liberty Tire’s chief operating officer, overseeing day-to-day operations for 28 manufacturing sites in eight regions throughout the U.S. and Canada. In his new role as CEO, Womble will lead the company’s next phase of growth.  

Read the source article at PR Newswire

California to push for law promoting tire-recycling

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California plans to boost the tire-recycling rate by pushing for legislation with USTMA support. AB 509, sponsored by Assembly Member Jim Frazier, would change the current state tire recycling grant program into an incentive program to help expand the use of tire-derived material. The measure also includes a provision to give Cal Recycle, the state scrap tire regulatory agency, authority to impose an additional tire fee on tire dealers to cover program administrative costs.

Read the source article at Traction News

Redisa under liquidation

To safeguard the program’s assets and operations, the Recycling and Economic Development Initiative of South Africa (Redisa) was placed under the liquidation.

Dr. Edna Molewa, Minister of Environmental Affairs, filed an urgent application at the Cape Town High Court to eliminate Redisa. Reportedly, the reason for elimination was Redisa’s intention to cease scrap tire collection.

Afterwards, the court appointed a liquidator to take immediate control over the organization including incentives to carry out the approved Integrated Industry Waste Tire Management Plan (IIWTMP). The Cabinet approved a policy decision to reshape the funding model which would affect financing of Redisa’s IIWTMP. According to the policy review, those changes were to align the funding model with the scope of the existing public finance management system.

Read the source article at weibold.com

ASIP grant funding Tyromer expansion

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OLDCASTLE, Ontario—Scrap tire devulcanization company Tyromer is outfitting a new production plant in Oldcastle with the $3.4 million in funding it received from Canada’s Automotive Supplier Innovation Program.

Read the source article at Rubber and Plastics News

ISRI2017: Scrap tire markets face multiple disruptions

Tire recycling has come a long way, says tire processing veteran and current consultant Terry Gray of Houston-based T.A.G. Resource Recovery. However, Gray also remarked while speaking at the Spotlight on Tires session at the ISRI2017 convention, some of the end markets for scrap tires are currently facing difficulties, causing a sense of disruption in the overall market. 

Gray said he started in the North American scrap tire processing sector in 1984, when as few as 1 percent of all scrap tires were being recycled. More than 30 years later, the industry can be described as “more mature” he said, with almost 90 percent of scrap tires now being processed for recycling. “That’s a pretty good track record,” said Gray.

The bad news for scrap tire processors are government-related obstacles being faced in several key end markets. Gray said a tax credit that had been available to users of tire-derived fuel (TDF) had expired in some states, “so [energy] plants are failing that had converted to TDF.”

He said officials in one such state, Michigan, are acknowledging they will need to find and boost alternative end markets for scrap tires, but Gray said in many New England states “It’s a real issue and they’ve got their heads in the sand.”

In the ground or crumb rubber markets, the sports field additive market had been emerging as a strong consumer, but that end market is taking a hit from (as yet unsubstantiated) claims that athletes coming into contact with crumb rubber on fields are experiencing health issues, including cancer.

By Gray’s estimate, some 30 percent of sports fields are in regions such as New England and California where regulators are advising turf managers to be wary of using crumb rubber. In 2015, 25 percent of crumb rubber was used on sports fields and another 23 percent as playground surfacing or as mulch, so shrinkage in any of those markets will cause considerable disruption, said Gray.

Gray characterized the rubberized asphalt market for ground tires as often subject to “wait and see” attitudes, but he said the manufactured products sector for molded rubber has been one brighter spot.

J.D. Wang, the CEO of California-based ReRubber LLC, says his company’s investors have been putting most of their R&D resources into the crumb rubber and powder categories, after acknowledging that the firm “has gone through eight years of disruption” itself. “In our first five years, we processed a lot, and failed a lot,” he commented.

ReRubber is now focusing on making rubber powder, researching and opening up end markets for the tire-derived powder to be used in protective and architectural coatings applications. The company is exploring a supply loop that Wang says allows it to “innovate” and conduct research in California, then more rapidly implement the ideas in Asia or “work out the kinks” there, and then bring successful ideas back to the United States.

Offering a point of view from state government, Elizabeth Hoover of the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) said in that state in the 1990s, TDF used at cement plants represented “about the only markets” for scrap tires.

She remarked that emissions concerns about zinc levels had harmed that market, and now the health questions surrounding the field turf market are presenting a new disruption. Unless scrap tire processors have diversified markets, “you have problems on your hands,” warned Hoover.

Her message to scrap tire processors was that states can provide help in the form of loans for equipment, workshops and conferences and assistance in identifying and developing end markets. She also remarked, however, that because of tight state budgets, “a lot of that [potential assistance] is beginning to dry up.”

ISRI2017 was in at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans April 22-27, 2017.

Read the source article at Recycling Today

Euro reycled rubber exposure data published

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HELSINKI — The European Chemicals Agency concluded recently there is “at most, a very low level of concern” from exposure to recycled rubber granules.

Read the source article at Tire Business