ANRPC releases Natural Rubber Trends & Statistics, April 2017

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The Association of Natural Rubber Producing Countries hereby releases the most updated picture of emerging developments in supply, demand and market trends in world rubber market, through the monthly bulletin “Natural Rubber Trends & Statistics” for April 2017.

… Based on the assessment, world supply of natural rubber, including supply from non-ANRPC countries, is anticipated to remain short of demand during all months up to December 2017. The shortfall is expected to progressively widen from April 2017 onwards to reach 688,000 tonnes in June 2017 before narrows down in subsequent months to reach 46,000 tonnes by December 2017.  

World supply during January to April 2017 was short of demand by 466,000 tonnes, according to preliminary estimates.  Despite a deficit supply, natural rubber prices have moved along a falling trajectory from February 2017 onwards largely due to factors external to the sector. Crude oil prices sharply fallen from February 2017 due to rising US shale gas output and reported failure in the effective implementation of the production curtailment programme agreed among OPEC members and major non-OPEC oil producing countries.  Low crude oil prices keep sentiments down at Shanghai rubber futures and physical markets often follow suit. 

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India: Rubber production up 22%, belies growers’ claims

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The ongoing tug-of-war between natural rubber growers and consumers bears this out in ample measure.

The tussle relates to the state of rubber growers, and their claims that heightened imports have impacted domestic rubber production, which is contested by the tyre industry.

According to the latest data from the Rubber Board, natural rubber production actually increased in 2016-17 by 22 per cent over the previous year, Additionally, rubber imports declined by 7 per cent.

Rubber Board officials attributed the increased production to improved market price and the Board’s initiatives, including mass contact programmes to improve production and productivity.

 

The data effectively belies the rubber growers’ claims and validates the tyre industry’s diametrically opposite view.

With improving availability of natural rubber in the domestic market, there is a perceptible drop in rubber imports, says Satish Sharma, Chairman Automotive Tyre Manufacturers Association (ATMA).

“That lends credence to the tyre industry’s stand that natural rubber imports are only taking place to compensate for the domestic deficiency or in view of non-availability of certain grades of rubber on quality parameters,” he said.

ATMA also rebuts the claim that rubber imports are down because domestic prices are ruling lower than international prices.

 

Read the source article at Global Rubber Markets News

India: Natural rubber imports decline 7% in 2016-17

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The fall in natural rubber (NR) imports as announced by the Rubber Board has much to do with the increased domestic availability of the commodity, according to the tyre industry. Recently Rubber Board had released fresh data for the financial year 2016-17 that showed NR imports declining by 7% as production moved up by 22% […]

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Analysis: Rubber mixing plants of the future

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LONDON—Rubber mixers will have to become more automated and part of “holistic” production set-ups to deal with complexity in both the materials being processed and end use markets, according to Andreas Limper, a senior executive of HF Mixing Group.

There is a continuing rise in the number and types of tires required by the automotive industry as  brings more and more car models onto the market, Limper noted at a recent HF event in Manchester,  to mark 100 years of the Banbury mixer.

“This trend will go further with new challenges like full electric  requiring low rolling resistance designs and so on. So you will see a higher variety of compounds [used] in the  industry,” the HF leader forecast.

Silica compounds

In terms of materials, Limper said the introduction of silica tire compounds and modified/functionalized polymers was making control of temperature and other parameters more critical within the mixer. Likewise, he noted the emergence of more complex carbon blacks, which are also harder to mix.

In response, Limper said, mixer manufacturers and operators will have to become even more …

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Synthetic rubber suppliers face a crude hard truth

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This observation — by Yuka Kimoto, director of marketing for Lion Elastomers — is the accepted wisdom in the synthetic rubber market, and with good reason.

Prices for a wide swath of synthetic rubbers have gone sharply up in the past few months, sparked by equally sharp increases in butadiene, methanol and other petrochemical feedstocks.

Considering oil prices alone, there is no reason to believe that feedstock prices — and, with them, SR prices — are coming down any time soon. As of March 30, futures for both West Texas Intermediate Crude and Brent Crude were at a three-week high, at around $50 or so per barrel, indicating bullish prices for anything based on petroleum.

However, according to authoritative sources, butadiene prices are starting to fall.

The reason is another well-known factor, in SR and in every other commodity: supply and demand. In the case of butadiene, there was another issue: location, location, location.

Scheduled and unscheduled maintenance shutdowns for butadiene facilities in Asia and Europe placed limits on the availability of butadiene, according to sources who spoke to Rubber & Plastics News and European Rubber Journal.

An unexpected surge of demand for butadiene in China, starting in the fall of 2016 and continuing into 2017, caused Asian butadiene prices to soar as high as $3,000 per metric ton. North American and European prices, though never as high as in Asia, rose accordingly.

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Global Automotive Rubber Molded Components Market – Forecasts and Trends (2017 – 2022)

The global automotive rubber moulded components sales grew from 65 million during the 2008-09 recession to over 89 million in 2015, with a spike of over 19% during the past seven years. In light of the growing demand for fuel-efficient and less polluting vehicles, the market for lightweight automotive components of higher durability is on the rise. Further, with chemical companies such as Chem-Trend coming up with better release agents and moulding process aids, the market for automotive rubber moulded components is expected to touch USD 45.16 billion by 2021. Technological advancements have been the major trigger for this growth. Innovations such as Ford’s eco-friendly rubber parts using soy oil and research labs trying to come up with better and durable rubber materials like EPDM are expected to drive the market at a CAGR of 6.26% by till 2022.

 

Read the source article at Global Information, Inc. (GII)

Supply and demand of neutral bearish rubber fell sharply

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March, natural rubber continued unilateral decline in the trend continued to continue unilateral decline, and continue to hit a new low, but then encounter, stabilized stabilized, and returned to a technical rebound, which reflects the supply and demand of natural rubber market The relationship is reversed from the background and the essence of the reversal.

Prospects and Strategy Suggestions

Looking forward to April trend, by the international and domestic aspects of the neutral factors of the neutral intertwined effect, in the surrounding Tokyo City, Singapore rubber market both down the trend of deep down, Hujiao market outlook will continue the formation of the original deep down Of the trend, while subject to the global macroeconomic and financial situation neutral factors, although the short-term may fall sharply, but the medium-term may return to the low regional concussion trend, the operation should be short-term low-absorbing high-throwing.

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ANRPC Releases Natural Rubber Trends & Statistics March 2017

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The monthly bulletin of Association of Natural Rubber Producing Countries (ANRPC), Natural Rubber Trends & Statistics, March 2017 is now available for our subscribers. During the first quarter of 2017, ANRPC member countries are estimated to have produced 2.499 million tonnes of natural rubber (NR), up 2.0% from the same period a year ago. Consumption […]

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World rubber consumption up 1.8 % in 2016, says IRSG

The world total rubber consumption increased to 27.2 million tonnes in 2016 with a 1.8% increase on a year-over-year, driven by strong market activities in China, especially in Q4 2016, according to the latest statistics from the International Rubber Study Group(IRSG). The auto industry in China registered a rapid growth, with its sales and production both hitting new records in 2016, signalling a recovery from Chinese manufacturing recession.

Read the source article at Rubber Asia

Anxiety over availability hits rubber

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The price of rubber has fallen with the same speed at which it shot up last month in the international market. In 30 days, it has risen to ₹200 a kg and returned to ₹170.

This was triggered by anxiety over the availability of rubber in major rubber producing countries. Due to repeated floods in the southern provinces of Thailand at the end of last year and at beginning of this year, tapping could not be done for long periods . Along with this, the expectation that rubber demand from China would pick up in the new year has influenced futures trading in rubber.

There was also a widespread feeling that there could be a shortage in the global availability of rubber. In the futures market the impact was sudden. When the floods in Thailand gradually receded the anxiety about the non availability of rubber disappeared and the prices started falling.

Read the source article at Global Rubber Markets News