Michelin is demonstrating resilience through an unprecedented crisis

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124,000 125,400 1 Free cash flow: net cash from operating activities less net cash used in investing activities, adjusted for net cash flows relating to other financial assets, before distributions. 2 At period-end. Covid-19: impact of the health crisis on the Group’s financial position at June 30, 2020 Review of the information released by the Group during the first six months of the year On February 10, 2020, the Group issued its guidance for 2020 excluding any impacts from a systemic crisis caused by Covid-19. On March 18, 2020 at 6:10 pm CET, the Michelin Group …

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Orion Engineered Carbons Commissions New Air Emissions Controls at U.S. Facility

HOUSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Orion Engineered Carbons S.A. (NYSE: OEC), a worldwide supplier of specialty and high-performance Carbon Black, today announced that it has successfully completed a significant upgrade of its emissions controls at its plant in Orange, Texas. As a result of these actions, the site complies with strengthened environmental standards which reduce the site’s emission permits for NOx and SO2 by 2,300 metric tons of air pollutant emissions per year.

 

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Cabot Completes Placement of Air Emission Control Equipment

Cabot Corporation CBT recently announced a significant achievement in its project at Franklin, LA site in the United States. Management stated that the company received all its major emission control equipment and positioned the same for completion on site as of Jun 2020.

Notably, Cabot is the first carbon black manufacturer to partner with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in conjunction with the national enforcement initiative of EPA to control air emissions from carbon black producing facilities.

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Carmakers must overhaul production plans to hit climate goals: report – Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) – The world’s 14 biggest carmakers are on course to miss globally agreed climate targets, a leading sustainable finance think tank said on Wednesday, urging investors to do more to pressure boards to change their production plans. The report by the 2° Investing Initiative and the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change looked at the firms’ plans for electric vehicles, hybrid and internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles and modelled vehicle emissions and climate scenarios from the International Energy Agency. None of the companies’ current plans were fully aligned with the Paris Agreement on climate change, which aims to …

Read the source article at reuters.com

Toyoda Gosei Sets Target of Cutting CO2 Emissions More Than 40% by 2030

Kiyosu, Japan, April 3, 2020: Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. has announced an environmental target for 2030 with the aim of stimulating efforts to cut CO2 emissions in its business activities.

In 2015 Toyoda Gosei adopted the TG 2020 Environmental Challenge, which lays out the company’s long term environmental targets. They include the aim of cutting the company’s CO2 emissions to approximately zero by 2050 to contribute to the fight against global warming. As a milestone on the road toward achieving that goal, the company has set a concrete target of achieving a 43% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030 compared to 2015 levels. Phased measures are being taken in two areas. One is to reduce energy consumption by eliminating energy loss at plants; innovating production technologies, such as by downsizing machines; and introducing energy-saving equipment. The other is to increase use of solar power and other forms of renewable energy.

Read the source article at Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd.

EU Automotive industry proposes ambitious recovery plan for the automotive sector

SAVING JOBS WHILE REDUCING EMISSIONS

Brussels, 26th of May 2020. – For many decades, the European automotive sector has been one of the key pillars of the economic and social welfare of Europe. Indirectly, the sector provides employment to 13,8 million workers. The European assembly plants still produce 1 in every 4 cars worldwide. The sector is highly innovative and accounts for 20% of industrial research funding in Europe. Europe’s automotive sector has become a global leader with a strong export orientation. It is a stronghold of European industry and a driver for jobs and economic growth across Europe. As a result of the substantial economic interlinkages with other sectors along the value chain, its importance for employment and growth for the whole economy is clear.

Read the source article at – CLEPA

Nokian has emissions targets approved

Nokian Tyres has had its emissions reduction targets approved by the Science Based Targets initiative. The targets cover emissions from Nokian’s operations, and make it the first tire company to receive this approval. Commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 cover scope 1 for direct emissions and scope 2 for indirect emissions from purchased energy. By 2030, Nokian is committed to reducing scope 1 and 2 emissions by 40% per ton using 2015 as a base year.

Read the source article at Tire Technology International

Continental launches VECTO, fleet tyres, emissions microsite

Continental AG has just launched a microsite containing information about the latest CO₂ emissions regulations for heavy goods vehicles and the VECTO (Vehicle Energy Consumption Calculation Tool) simulation tool.

The post Continental launches VECTO, fleet tyres, emissions microsite appeared first on Tyrepress.

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Michelin opens first zero-emission plant

Clermont-Ferrand, France – Michelin has inaugurated its first zero emission plant in Les Gravanches, near Clermont-Ferrand, the French tire maker has announced.

Powered 100% by renewable energy and with zero CO2 emissions, the plant is the “first of its kind” in the world, said Michelin CEO Florent Menegaux during an annual results conference call 10 Feb.

Built in 2001, the facility manufactures ultra-high performance tires for high-end cars and motorcycles, according to the French press.

Read the source article at European Rubber Journal

New technologies improve efficiencies in tire manufacturing: New Smithers Rapra report details key trends

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The need for more automation and faster size changes in tires over the last couple of decades has led to an industry manufacturing transformation. This transformation has changed factory design and driven changes in tire building machines, process equipment and tires themselves. Some changes are the result of regulations, heightened OEM and consumer performance requirements, and new tire materials. These improvements in tire manufacturing and others are detailed in the new Smithers Rapra market report The Future of Tire Manufacturing to 2024.

Improvements in manufacturing processes have been ongoing since the first tire factories and have accelerated over the last decade – spurred by the increased focus on environmental issues. The construction of new factories will help meet growing demand and handle new equipment more easily. Advances in automation have also helped significantly, although there are still significant savings to be realized, as well as increasing environmental regulations with which to comply. These together mean that improvements in manufacturing efficiencies will continue to be a focus for tire companies.

Developments affecting tire plants and manufacturing processes are as diverse as the penetration of new vehicle powertrains, logistical burdens, emergence of new markets, mergers and acquisitions, and the increased value and scarcity of real estate.

Regional developments

Tire demand and industry growth are driving manufacturing expansion at both the regional and global level. Distribution of tire manufacturing capacity and production across the major regions of the world is shaped by local tire demand from OEM and replacement market customers and favorable costs of the production factors.

Tire manufacturers tend to establish local factories in their most important sales areas, most recently focusing on Asia, according to The Future of Tire Manufacturing to 2024. The reverse is also happening with Asian producers setting up production close to customers they consider important, such as US-based OEMs. For this reason North American tire manufacturing is showing growth while the mature European market with lose share over the coming five years. Raw material prices are very similar all over the world, but labor and energy costs vary by region or country.

Tire demand drives manufacturing

Global tire demand is the ultimate driver of tire manufacturing, with both vehicles in use generating ongoing tire wear and replacement needs, and new vehicle sales requiring OEM tires to be fitted. Overall global tire demand is expected to grow 4% per year in unit terms in 2019-24.

The global tire industry as measured by tonnage of production is estimated to be 19.25 million tons in 2019, and is anticipated to grow at a 3.4% compound annual growth rate through 2024, to 22.75 million tons.

 

This growth is being driven and shaped by a variety of economic, technology and regulatory, demographic and consumer trends at the global, regional and national level, including alternative powertrains and autonomous vehicles, improvement in materials including sustainable substitutes and changing customer requirements like greater fuel efficiency with reduced emissions. There is a continuing high-performance trend towards larger OEM tire sizes/rim diameters, as well as ongoing pressure on automakers to meet emissions and fuel economy standards for individual vehicles as well as fleets, while tire companies adapt to consumer labelling schemes in Europe and increasingly, elsewhere.

Influence of vehicle mix and design

Trends in both conventional and emerging segments of motor vehicles have a critical influence on tires requirements and manufacturing, requiring a lot of planning and flexibility. For instance, a continuing shift towards light trucks away from passenger cars in developed markets coexists with growth in developing markets in entry level vehicle segments. The shifts at the OEM level have been underway for years, as seen by the continuing high growth of higher performance vehicles as well as eco-friendly vehicles and fleets.

Changes in tire types and design

A tire’s key required or desirable characteristics include safety, reliability, wet and dry traction, snow performance/wet performance, handling, high rolling efficiency, noise and life (miles)/longevity. New tire developments are constantly occurring, and there are substantial changes every year. Tire attributes in flux include tread/shape, material types and material chemistry, among others, and that does not even include the many concept tires.

Tire makers have made their primary commitment to produce ever more technically advanced tires (e.g. with sensors to measure tread depth, temperature and provide real-time alerts to drivers), run-flat tires including self-sealing tires, self-inflating tires, air-free tire  technologies, and reduced noise or noise-dampening tire technology (important for quiet electric vehicles).

Technology impact on tire manufacturing to produce these technically advance tires includes new molds, laser carving tools, new test equipment (especially for noise), as well as material changes such as different resins, silicas, and aramid fiber.

EV tire requirements

Use of electric vehicles (EVs) is on the rise and one obvious effect of the uptake of electric powertrains is the increased complexity of tire varieties. This includes the further SKU (stocking unit) proliferation from increased variation in OE tire types and sizes. Tire wear concerns with EVs make higher wear resistance critical, since traditional tires wear 30% faster on EVs than on conventional vehicles.

EV tires require optimized footprint shape and contact pressure distribution to avoid irregular wear. Maximizing battery range requires continued reduction of rolling resistance, and the additional weight of EVs may require even lighter weight tires. Quiet electric vehicles require emphasis on noise reduction on top of existing pressure from labeling schemes.

AV tire evolution

Many EV tire changes also apply to autonomous vehicles (likely to be all or mostly electric), but the introduction and spread of autonomous driving means that further changes are emerging and will have to be scaled up alongside more traditional manufacturing.

Tire sensing and communication capabilities are emerging at OE and aftermarket levels. Various types of tire condition and wear sensors and intelligent tires are in development, with some approaching market readiness in advance of the big future shift to autonomous vehicles.

Autonomous self-steering cars will mean that tire-vehicle communication becomes more important meaning tire sensors will be needed. Connected tires will contribute to road sensing, vehicle operation, and predictive maintenance (wear/damage sensing).

Emphasis on low noise and high ride quality will increase. Reliability requirements may be higher, increasing potential market for run-flat tires and eventual non-pneumatics. As AVs become the norm, the light vehicle tire may characterized by their tall and skinny shape (for aerodynamics and other attributes), sensor technology, no speed rating (driving speeds will be programmed and limited), better ride and less NVH (noise, vibration and harshness), ultra low rolling resistance (improving fuel economy), possible run-flat technology (if it can be lightweight enough) and labeling for compatibility.

For more information about the Smithers Rapra market report “The Future of Tire Manufacturing”, visit: https://www.smithersrapra.com/market-reports/tire-industry-market-reports/the-future-of-tire-manufacturing-to-2024

Janine Young is a career b2b communications professional with a background in trade journalism, corporate communications and public relations. She is a member of the Smithers Rapra reports and consultancy team that publishes market reports for members of the tire and rubber industries. She is editor of the Smithers Report, a subscription news service that focuses on tire and rubber industry trends and technology.

Read the source article at smithersrapra.com