Tire inflation survey a wake-up call to drivers

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Cambridge, Ontario, May 14, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Canadian drivers have glaring gaps in their knowledge about how to maintain proper tire inflation, according to a new tire maintenance attitudinal survey conducted by Leger on behalf of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada.

While nine-in-ten drivers surveyed believe motorists have a responsibility to make their vehicles as fuel efficient as possible and 96 per cent say proper tire inflation is important, the survey also finds that:

  • Only 30 per cent measure their tires’ inflation pressures monthly, a practice essential to fuel economy, road safety and protecting the environment
  • 65 per cent are unaware inflation pressures should only be measured when tires are cold. (A vehicle should be stationary for at least three hours or not have been driven more than two kilometres prior to checking tire inflation. Measuring pressures when tires are warm gives an inaccurate reading.)
  • 37 per cent refer to the air pressure stamped on the tire’s sidewall when identifying the correct pressure for their tires. (The imprinted sidewall pressure is the maximum pressure a tire can contain under maximum load, not the recommended inflation level. Prolonged driving at this inflation pressure may result in uneven tread wear and reduced traction, particularly on wet surfaces.)
  • 22 per cent rely on visual inspections to determine if their tires are inflated properly. (A tire can be underinflated by 20 per cent or more and look normal.)

Among motorists who say proper tire inflation is important to them, top reasons cited include: vehicle safety (84 per cent) followed by longer tire life (74 per cent), fuel economy (73 per cent) and improved vehicle handling (71 per cent).

Other positive news emerging from the study is that 61 per cent of drivers use a personal air pressure gauge when measuring tire pressures. As well, 86 per cent report they rotated their tires in the past year and 66 per cent had their vehicle’s tire alignment checked in the past 12 months.

“Canadian drivers understand the benefits of proper tire inflation and that’s great news,” says Glenn Maidment, president of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC), which represents tire makers. “However, the survey also emphasizes the urgent requirement for broader driver knowledge and education on tire inflation facts and procedures. The need is particularly acute among younger drivers who are significantly less likely to know inflation pressures should be measured monthly and when tires are cold. Learning a few simple facts and procedures advances safety, maximizes fuel efficiency and protects the environment.”

Fuel economy, environmental benefits
Measuring tire pressures monthly can result in cost savings. Motorists can improve their gas mileage by 0.6 per cent on average – up to three per cent in some cases – by keeping tires inflated to the proper pressure. Underinflated tires can lower gas mileage by about 0.2 per cent for every one psi drop in the average pressure of all tires.

The environmental benefits of proper tire inflation are also significant. Drivers operating their vehicles on underinflated tires are expected to waste more than 500 million litres of fuel in 2018. This is enough fuel to drive 275,000 vehicles for a full year. This wasted fuel will release an additional 1.2 million tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Low Rolling Resistance Tires
A recent TRAC survey also found 81 per cent of Canadian drivers are unfamiliar with low rolling resistance (LRR) tires. These tires are designed with specialized tread patterns that keep vehicles moving efficiently, advanced rubber technologies and materials that minimize internal movements inside the rubber itself and materials that lower weight, increase rigidity and improve aerodynamics. The result is a range of two to four per cent in improved fuel economy. For motorists who drive approximately 25,000 km per year, this translates to between $50 to $100 in fuel savings per year, so the average motorist can expect to save hundreds of dollars over the lifetime of these tires.

To help motorists improve their fuel-saving know-how, TRAC is providing an informative ‘Get Fuel Fit’ Guide – a free, online resource offering advice on tire selection, maintenance and driving habits that improve fuel economy and protect the environment.

May 14 to 21, 2018, is National Be Tire Smart Week, during which the tire industry will be reminding motorists about the fuel efficiency, safety and environmental benefits of proper tire inflation and maintenance.

Canadians can also learn more by visiting www.betiresmart.ca.

Methodology
A survey of 801 Canadian motorists was completed online between April 12 and April 19, 2018, using Leger’s, LegerWeb panel. A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of ± 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.


Michal Majernik, Tire and Rubber Association of Canada, (519) 249-0366; mmajernik@tracanada.ca

Michelle Magee, Xposure PR, (416) 471-2336; michelle@xposurepr.com

Read the source article at Send Press Releases with GlobeNewswire

Bridgestone study highlights fatal tire failings

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Birmingham, UK – Almost 75% of motorway incidents related to tire failure could be prevented if drivers carry out simple checks, according new research by Highways England and Bridgestone.

The 18-month study, released at last week’s Commercial Vehicle Show in Birmingham, found that more than 30 people were killed or seriously injured in motorway accidents in 2016 due to illegal or faulty tires.

The research found that almost three quarters of tire failure samples…

Read the source article at European Rubber Journal

Major brands vs Budget Tyres; The right approach

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I have recently been researching the international tyre market in order to reach a viewpoint on two of the industry’s most controversial questions – What is the difference between major A brands produced by leading manufacturers such as Michelin, Bridgestone, Pirelli, Goodyear Dunlop, Continental and Yokohama and more economically priced budget tyres? So are cheaper tyres effectively a ‘false market’ when it comes to quality, comfort and safety? Also how intensive and dedicated are tyre dealers/retailers and garages in actually explaining the varying qualities and benefits of individual brands to their customers?

Read the source article at Rubber Asia

TIA Promotes Tire Safety During National Car Care Month

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The Tire Industry Association (TIA) will spread tire safety tips to take part in April’s National Car Care Month.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, nearly 11,000 tire-related car crashes occur in the United States. Throughout the month of April, the Tire Industry Association will focus on educating drivers on the importance of keeping tires properly inflated while highlighting other important aspects of tire maintenance safety tips.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Why You Absolutely Need Winter Tires, Even If You Have All-Wheel Drive

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Short of a conspiracy theory by tire companies, I couldn’t imagine a scenario where a seasonal set of tires would do the job an all-wheel drive system couldn’t. Of course, I was much younger then, and much less sensible. Yet I hear that same excuse — that power to more wheels means you don’t need winter tires — from people much older than me, not to mention far wiser.

Read the source article at Car Reviews

Save money with these simple motoring tips

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Save money with these simple motoring tips Simple changes can add up to a big saving A Staff Reporter Updated: 15:35 Friday 25 August 2017 Promoted by Switch Off and Breathe There are cost-free, straight-forward tasks you can undertake immediately to ensure your car is running as efficiently as possible, saving you money – and looking after the environment. Car ownership is an expensive business.

Read the source article at Edinburgh Evening News

French chef Alleno earns sixth Michelin star as haute cuisine gets ′uncomplicated′ | Lifestyle | DW.COM | 09.02.2017

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The latest additions to France’s prestigious Michelin Guide were revealed Thursday in Paris. Only one restaurant was added to the three-star list: Le 1947 in the exclusive ski resort of Courchevel.

Head chef Yannick Alleno reacted to the award by tweeting that he was “beyond happiness,” and congratulated his teams both at Le 1947 and at his Paris restaurant Le Pavillon Ledoyen, which already holds three Michelin stars.

Michael Ellis, the American-French head of the Michelin Guide, called the cuisine at Le 1947 “extremely technical, creative and tasty.” Menus there range from 127 to 450 euros ($135-480), not including wine, and feature dishes such as steamed scallops with celery extract and caviar.

While Alleno’s house was the only restaurant in France to receive a third star this year, 12 were added to the two-star list and 57 to the one-star list. In total, France now has 27 one-star restaurants, 86 with two stars and 503 one-star locations.

The Paris hotel Le George V was already home to a three-star restaurant, but won stars for two others within its house, making it the first hotel in Europe to boast three Michelin-starred restaurants.

Read the source article at TOP STORIES

Icy and Dicey: Avoid Unnecessary Risks National Safe Driving Week

Although Canadians are used to snow flurries, ice patches and bone-chilling cold temperatures, winters still seem to arrive earlier than anyone expects it every year. And, unfortunately, this unexpected arrival combines with a lack of driver preparation to create a dangerous cocktail of collisions, near misses and, in some cases, fatalities.

December 1-7 is National Safe Driving Week and the Canada Safety Council would like to remind you of the importance of preparing yourself for winter driving. During the non-winter season, bad driving habits can creep into a driver’s repertoire, including aggressive braking and a lack of space around your car. These same habits just don’t work in the wintertime, as snow and slush are much more unforgiving than dry and clear pavement.

Read the source article at canadasafetycouncil.org

Are winter tires really worth it?

It’s an inescapable autumnal rite. Thousands of Canadians are agonizing over whether to get their winter tires now or wait until the first snow warning.

That is, if they have winter tires. Thousands more will debate whether to buy a set or roll the dice with their all-season rubber.

Winter-tire use rose dramatically between 1998 and 2014, according to a survey commissioned and released two years ago by the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC), going from 35 per cent to 65 per cent. But if you remove Quebec’s near 100 per cent usage rate, the national average shrank to only 50 per cent.

The association plans to issue updated results this year but Barry Yutronkie, its director of operations, said a quick look shows the trend has levelled off.

“We do have some preliminary numbers,” Yutronkie told Globe Drive. “It looks like there’s a slight uptick from the last report, higher utilization – it’s basically jumped up one per cent.

“From what I’m seeing, it’s fairly flat as far as utilization is concerned.”

It’s a “slow march,” concedes Graham Jeffery, Canadian Tire’s assistant vice-president for tires and automotive outdoor adventure. Few people get to compare the difference in braking and handling directly between all-seasons and winter tires, he said, unless they attend a tire demonstration.

Read the source article at Home – The Globe and Mail

Dangers Of Driving In Summer

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… If your tyres are showing signs of wear or they’re at the wrong pressure, heat will increase the risk of a blowout which can be dangerous when travelling at speed.

Families heading off for the weekend will likely overload their cars and not adjust tyre pressures to suit the extra load. Guidance on adjusting tyres for increased cargo weight will be advised in your vehicle’s handbook. Being aware of this could prevent a nasty accident.

Read the source article at Mirror Online