Global Tire Recycling Market Analysis Report 2016-2024

According to Goldstein Research, global tire recycling market is expected to grow from USD 0.95 billion in 2016, at a compounded annual growth rate of 2.1% over the forecast period 2016-2024. The increasing environmental concerns related to CO2 and scrap tires has led to adopt new strategies for recycling and reusing the waste tires and thus inducing the growth of the market.

Read the source article at Express Press Release Distribution

Safely Reduce Synthetic Turf Heat with Greenplay® Organic Infill

curata__F73n2vWKlLer4NG.jpeg

NEW YORK, Sept. 11, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — The two new synthetic soccer fields installed using Greenplay® organic infill blend perfectly with the adjacent natural grass field installed last year at UNC Wilmington. Transitioning from natural to synthetic turf with Greenplay installed is…

Read the source article at PR Newswire

RM of LdB Evaluates Rubber Road Construction

The RM of Lac du Bonnet hosted an information session on Aug. 7 to show other communities where the rubber meets the road. Facilitated by representatives from Reliable Tire Recycling (RTR) in Winnipeg, the purpose of the presentation was to review the use of rubber aggregate in road construction.

“Invitations were sent to approximately 50 RMs in the province,” said Keith Harris, special project manager for RTR, who welcomed representatives from the Towns of Winkler and

Altona, and the RMs of Fisher, Coldwell and De Salaberry to the presentation. Last year, the RM of Lac du Bonnet used rubber aggregate to repair a stretch of Red Deer Road that had been particularly susceptible to frost damage in the past. They were pleased to report the application has been effective. …

Read the source article at Digital Publishing Software

Large tires find second lives through recycling efforts

curata__Zm6UTdB50rt9zxz.jpeg

Kal Tire is removing tires from the scrap pile through a new program to shred and reuse massive Off-the-road tires.

Tires are the foundation of transportation in North America – quite literally. Estimates from 2015 suggest that in the United States and Canada there are around 300 million passenger vehicles on the roads. Some simple math suggests that this number means there are some 1.2 billion tires in contact with road surfaces at any particular time.

Read the source article at Traction News

Frankie Flowers’ Recycled Garden at Canada Blooms

curata__tWa3ooVJDBP2DGw.jpeg

OTS’s presence really blossomed at this year’s Canada Blooms, an annual gardening Festival that takes place in Toronto and connects attendees looking to stretch their green thumbs and see what is trending in landscape design and horticultural activity. This year, an engaged crowd of aspiring garden gurus were treated to an informative and entertaining presentation by none other than Frankie Flowers.

Frankie educated onlookers on some of the new and not so new trends emerging with respect to the recycled garden. One thing that he emphasized to the crowd was to take some lessons on recycling from our more industrious and resourceful ancestors, who often used things like bath water, egg shells and fish bits to fortify their garden plots. They practiced container gardening long before we did, and would grow tomatoes out of a tire, as the tire provides a raised platform for the tomatoes to flourish. With this process, there are fewer weeds than planting tomatoes in a more conventional fashion, the soil gets warmer faster, and most importantly, the tire beds yield a faster harvest!

Frankie highlighted the recycled materials that can be used in present-day gardens and highlighted the variety of ways tires can be put to good use in the form of planters, outdoor tires and garden edging.

Read the source article at Rethink Tires

Recycled rubber infill causes a very low level of concern

ECHA has evaluated the risk of substances in recycled rubber that is used on artificial sports pitches. Based on the evidence, ECHA has concluded that the concern for players on these pitches, including children, and for workers who install and maintain them is very low. ECHA will update its evaluation as and when new information becomes available.

Helsinki, 28 February 2017 – In June 2016, the European Commission asked ECHA to evaluate the risk to the general population, including children, professional players and workers installing or maintaining the pitches.

A number of hazardous substances are present in recycled rubber granules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, phthalates, volatile organic hydrocarbons (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic hydrocarbons (SVOCs). Exposure to these substances through skin contact, ingestion and inhalation was considered.

Based on the information available, ECHA concludes that there is, at most, a very low level of concern from exposure to recycled rubber granules:

  • The concern for lifetime cancer risk is very low given the concentrations of PAHs typically measured in European sports grounds.
  • The concern from metals is negligible given that the data indicated that the levels are below the limits allowed in the current toys legislation.
  • No concerns were identified from the concentrations of phthalates, benzothiazole and methyl isobutyl ketone as these are below the concentrations that would lead to health problems.
  • It has been reported that volatile organic compounds emitted from rubber granules in indoor halls might cause irritation to the eyes and skin.

Read the source article at Homepage

Crumb Rubber Athletic Turf — Health Department Analysis Finds No Cancer Link

curata__Kv04ZFnVU20ON7f.jpeg

OLYMPIA, Wash.—A newly issued analysis from the Washington State Department of Health concluded there is no evidence that cancer rates among young athletes are increased by playing on crumb rubber athletic turf.

“We did not find the number of cancers among soccer players, select and premier players or goalkeepers reported to the project team to be higher than expected based on Washington cancer rates for people of the same ages,” said the executive summary of the analysis from the WSDOH.

A coalition of three synthetic turf associations—the Recycled Rubber Council, the Safe Fields Alliance and the Synthetic Turf Council—said they were pleased but not surprised by the results of the WSDOH analysis.

“The findings address an area of uncertainty and lend further credence to the many available scientific analyses on the subject with consistent conclusions,” said Michael Peterson, scientific adviser to the RRC. “The best evidence indicates there are no safety risks associated with chemicals found in recycled rubber infill.”

Read the source article at home.rubbernews.com

Study finds no increased rate of cancer among soccer players

curata__Kv04ZFnVU20ON7f.jpeg

An investigation into a suspected cancer cluster among soccer players in Washington state found fewer than expected cases in the 5 to 24 age group, casting doubt on a theory that playing on artificial turf fields could increase the risk for cancer.

Officials from the Washington State Department of Health and the University of Washington School of Public Health launched the study after a coach for the UW women’s soccer team compiled a list of some 30 soccer players in the state who had been diagnosed with cancer, primarily Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, from the mid-1990s to 2015. The coach was particularly concerned about the number of goalkeepers with cancer and floated a theory that exposure to bits of recycled rubber used as infill in synthetic fields might be the cause. The list was later expanded to include more than 50 individuals with cancer, including some nonsoccer players who exercised on synthetic fields.

“We found that the number of cancers among all soccer players reported by the coach was less than expected, given rates of cancer in Washington residents of similar age,” said Dr. Cathy Wasserman, state epidemiologist for non-infectious conditions and lead investigator for the study.

The analysis calculated that given the number of soccer players in the state and the rate of cancer in the 5- to 24-year-old age group in the state, some 1,384 soccer players would develop cancer if there were no increased risk from synthetic turfs.

The finding suggests that the cancers reported by the coach, on its own, does not support a link between playing soccer and cancer. That was also true for goalkeepers and for players competing at higher levels, known as select or premier players.

Read the source article at bendbulletin.com

December 2016 Status Report: Federal Research Action Plan on Recycled Tire Crumb

Early in 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (CDC/ATSDR) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in collaboration with the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), launched a multi-agency effort called the Federal Research Action Plan on Recycled Tire Crumb Used on Playing Fields and Playgrounds. On December 30, 2016 the agencies released a status report on the Federal Research Action Plan which does not include research findings. It provides a summary of activities to date, including: (1) stakeholder outreach, (2) an overview of the tire crumb rubber manufacturing industry, (3) the final peer-reviewed Literature Review/Gaps Analysis (LRGA), (4) progress on the research activities, and (5) next steps and a timeline for completion of the final report.

The Literature Review/Gaps Analysis (LRGA) was developed to provide a current summary of the available literature and capture the data gaps as characterized in those publications. The Literature Review/Gaps Analysis identifies  90 references. Each reference was reviewed and categorized according to 20 general information categories (e.g., study topic, geographic location, sample type, conditions and populations studied) and more than 100 sub-categories (e.g., study topic subcategories: site characterization, production process, leaching, off-gassing, microbial analysis, human risk).

The full Literature Review/Gaps Analysis is in Appendix B of the Status Report.

 

Read the source article at US Environmental Protection Agency

Crumb rubber will fill in two Ken-Ton athletic fields – The Buffalo News

curata__fgriGNW2NbINE2z.jpeg

Two new athletic fields planned in the Kenmore-Town of Tonawanda School District will be in-filled with crumb rubber as originally planned, after a federal report last month offered no new revelations about potential health effects of the material made of recycled automotive tires.

The Ken-Ton School Board in October agreed to adopt a “wait-and-see approach” on whether to use crumb rubber to in-fill artificial turf planned for Kenmore West High School and Crosby Field while it awaited a status report from the Environmental Protection Agency.

But Trustee Thomas J. Reigstad, who first raised the concerns, said the report was inconclusive and he recommended that the district move forward with its original plans for crumb rubber, also known as styrene-butadiene rubber.

“In the end, our wait-and-see approach did not interrupt the project and it cost the district nothing,” said Reigstad, co-chair of a subcommittee formed to look into the issue.

Read the source article at The Buffalo News