Goodyear Promotes National Tire Safety Week

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For National Tire Safety Week, now through May 28, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. will promote awareness for proper tire care via its social media channels and website, particularly around tire pressure, tire tread and tire rotations. The iconic Goodyear Blimp will also spread messages of tire safety from the air on its electronic message boards throughout the week.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Bridgestone Relaunches TireSafety.com

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Bridgestone Americas, Inc. (Bridgestone) has relaunched TireSafety.com, a consumer website dedicated to providing drivers with important tire and driving safety information. The website refresh is part of the company’s dedication to National Tire Safety Week (May 21 – May 28), an industry initiative led by the U.S. Tire Manufacturers Association (USTMA).

“Tires are an important vehicle safety feature – they are the only part of a car that touch the road and play a critical role in ensuring drivers can accelerate, stop and turn safely,” said Dave Johnson, chief quality officer, Bridgestone Americas. “Many drivers don’t realize that the safety and performance of their tires are highly dependent on proper care and maintenance. As the number one tire company in the world, we have an important role to play in educating drivers about how tires impact their safety and are committed to providing drivers with hands-on information to make tire maintenance simple.”

Read the source article at Tire Review

Michelin shines spotlight on worn tire testing video – Roadshow

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Michelin shines spotlight on worn tire testing Flogging worn tires in wet conditions further proves that all tires aren’t created equal. 

 

Read the source article at Product reviews, how

Tire inflation survey a wake-up call to drivers

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Cambridge, Ontario, May 14, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Canadian drivers have glaring gaps in their knowledge about how to maintain proper tire inflation, according to a new tire maintenance attitudinal survey conducted by Leger on behalf of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada.

While nine-in-ten drivers surveyed believe motorists have a responsibility to make their vehicles as fuel efficient as possible and 96 per cent say proper tire inflation is important, the survey also finds that:

  • Only 30 per cent measure their tires’ inflation pressures monthly, a practice essential to fuel economy, road safety and protecting the environment
  • 65 per cent are unaware inflation pressures should only be measured when tires are cold. (A vehicle should be stationary for at least three hours or not have been driven more than two kilometres prior to checking tire inflation. Measuring pressures when tires are warm gives an inaccurate reading.)
  • 37 per cent refer to the air pressure stamped on the tire’s sidewall when identifying the correct pressure for their tires. (The imprinted sidewall pressure is the maximum pressure a tire can contain under maximum load, not the recommended inflation level. Prolonged driving at this inflation pressure may result in uneven tread wear and reduced traction, particularly on wet surfaces.)
  • 22 per cent rely on visual inspections to determine if their tires are inflated properly. (A tire can be underinflated by 20 per cent or more and look normal.)

Among motorists who say proper tire inflation is important to them, top reasons cited include: vehicle safety (84 per cent) followed by longer tire life (74 per cent), fuel economy (73 per cent) and improved vehicle handling (71 per cent).

Other positive news emerging from the study is that 61 per cent of drivers use a personal air pressure gauge when measuring tire pressures. As well, 86 per cent report they rotated their tires in the past year and 66 per cent had their vehicle’s tire alignment checked in the past 12 months.

“Canadian drivers understand the benefits of proper tire inflation and that’s great news,” says Glenn Maidment, president of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC), which represents tire makers. “However, the survey also emphasizes the urgent requirement for broader driver knowledge and education on tire inflation facts and procedures. The need is particularly acute among younger drivers who are significantly less likely to know inflation pressures should be measured monthly and when tires are cold. Learning a few simple facts and procedures advances safety, maximizes fuel efficiency and protects the environment.”

Fuel economy, environmental benefits
Measuring tire pressures monthly can result in cost savings. Motorists can improve their gas mileage by 0.6 per cent on average – up to three per cent in some cases – by keeping tires inflated to the proper pressure. Underinflated tires can lower gas mileage by about 0.2 per cent for every one psi drop in the average pressure of all tires.

The environmental benefits of proper tire inflation are also significant. Drivers operating their vehicles on underinflated tires are expected to waste more than 500 million litres of fuel in 2018. This is enough fuel to drive 275,000 vehicles for a full year. This wasted fuel will release an additional 1.2 million tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Low Rolling Resistance Tires
A recent TRAC survey also found 81 per cent of Canadian drivers are unfamiliar with low rolling resistance (LRR) tires. These tires are designed with specialized tread patterns that keep vehicles moving efficiently, advanced rubber technologies and materials that minimize internal movements inside the rubber itself and materials that lower weight, increase rigidity and improve aerodynamics. The result is a range of two to four per cent in improved fuel economy. For motorists who drive approximately 25,000 km per year, this translates to between $50 to $100 in fuel savings per year, so the average motorist can expect to save hundreds of dollars over the lifetime of these tires.

To help motorists improve their fuel-saving know-how, TRAC is providing an informative ‘Get Fuel Fit’ Guide – a free, online resource offering advice on tire selection, maintenance and driving habits that improve fuel economy and protect the environment.

May 14 to 21, 2018, is National Be Tire Smart Week, during which the tire industry will be reminding motorists about the fuel efficiency, safety and environmental benefits of proper tire inflation and maintenance.

Canadians can also learn more by visiting www.betiresmart.ca.

Methodology
A survey of 801 Canadian motorists was completed online between April 12 and April 19, 2018, using Leger’s, LegerWeb panel. A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of ± 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.


Michal Majernik, Tire and Rubber Association of Canada, (519) 249-0366; mmajernik@tracanada.ca

Michelle Magee, Xposure PR, (416) 471-2336; michelle@xposurepr.com

Read the source article at Send Press Releases with GlobeNewswire

Four elements of a successful tire management program

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Tires represent one of a fleet’s largest operating costs, so having an effective tire management program is essential. But that doesn’t mean it has to be overly complex. Even small fleets without a dedicated “tire guy” can put in place a simple, but effective, tire management program.

MARK IT ON THE CALENDAR

Mike Buck, president of MCB Consulting, is a fan of using a calendar, and his consulting firm has helped several fleets reduce tire costs by implementing one. Most tire manufacturers offer tire calendars that can be installed on tractors and trailers.

“It can be used to manage your tires if you can’t afford air inflation systems and you can’t thoroughly inspect every tire in every yard every day,” Buck explained.

Every time a unit’s tires are given a thorough visual inspection – inflation, tread depth, wear patterns – the day of the month is written into …

Read the source article at Traction News

Tyre Tread Depth Michelin Stance

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Michelin has vocally opposed the need for any legal change to their tyre tread depth laws amid raging campaigns these days for a standard 2 mm or even 3 mm as the minimum tread depth for a summer car tyre instead of 1.6 mm fixed early.

This recurring argument has raged on for years and still shows no signs of going away. Old hands in this business recall the bonanza the industry experienced when legal minimum tread depths were first introduced decades ago now. This lurking folk memory still exists, I fear, and there are many among us who still hanker for the instant boost these changes in the law can deliver.

Of course, it is largely self-serving although ‘safety’ is always the mask that hides the face. Across almost all of Europe, the legal minimum tread depth for a summer car tyre has been fixed at 1.6 mm for many a year now; but recently there have been attempts to campaign for a standard 2 mm or even 3 mm. The argument is familiar and generally hinges around wet grip safety with much made of metrological data concerning the amount of time our road surfaces are damp or wet. Michelin, however, will have none of this and to the despair of some has vocally opposed the need for any legal changes to our tread depth laws. Some of the arguments are interesting.

Firstly, Michelin claim that technically superior products (sic) such as theirs are designed to perform optimally throughout their lives.
Secondly, even a well-worn down premium brand will still out-perform many a brand-new budget tyre regardless. Thirdly, tyres can actually improve with age becoming quieter and delivering better rolling resistance (economy). Sustained longevity has become the Michelin watchword…

Read the source article at Rubber Asia

Sentury Debuts Tire Subscription Service

Sentury Tires has unveiled a new service called AvanTech, a monthly subscription service that provides customers with four new tires as needed when the tires wear down.

The cost starts at $17.95 per month, depending on the tires desired and the annual mileage the customer puts on them. The deal includes installation, road hazard coverage, tire inspections, and service.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Discount Tire Offers Drivers Tire Safety Tips For Winter

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PITTSBURGH, Nov. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Did you know that at 45 degrees you can begin to see your breath? And that very same temperature is when the all-season tires on your car can start to lose traction and grip? As temperatures begin to drop in Pennsylvania, the neighborhood…

Read the source article at PR Newswire

Winter tires now the fastest growing tire category in Canada

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Winter tire use is gradually rising, but driver education about safety benefits remains essential to wintertime accident prevention. Four-in-ten drivers outside Quebec still do not own winter tires.

Cambridge, November 14, 2017 – Winter tire shipments across Canada have grown at an annualized rate of four per cent over the past five years making winters the fastest growing tire category, according to the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC).

The growth of this category is due to efforts by tire makers, retailers and the government to educate drivers about the superior traction and shorter stopping distances provided by winter tires. Government incentives to make winter tires more affordable have also had a positive impact.

TRAC’s 2017 Canadian Consumer Winter Tire Study, conducted by Leger, found that 66 per cent of Canadian motorists ride on winter tires. But outside Quebec, where winter tires are the law, the percentage drops to 60 per cent. For the approximately 40 per cent of motorists found by the survey not to be using winter tires, the top reasons were the belief that all-season tires provide sufficient traction (51 per cent), reduced driving in winter (22 per cent) and cost (21 per cent).

Regionally, the 2017 study found:

  • 60 per cent of British Columbia drivers ride on winter tires
  • Alberta’s usage rate is 57 per cent
  • In Manitoba and Saskatchewan usage stands at 48 per cent
  • 59 per cent of Ontario drivers use winters
  • In Atlantic Canada, where winter tire usage is surpassed only by Quebec, the usage rate is 83 per cent

To support consumer education, TRAC has just released a new report detailing winter tire use in Canada and the latest market and test data. Read the full 2017 Winter Tire Report here: http://bit.ly/Winter-Tire-Report-2017orwww.tracanada.ca.

“Despite increasing winter tire usage, educating drivers about the safety benefits of winter tires remains critical to making our roads safer in winter”, says Glenn Maidment, president of TRAC. “The fact that four-in-ten motorists outside Quebec are not using winter tires puts at risk everyone who drives in cold-weather conditions – regardless of whether the road surface is dry, snow-covered or icy. Every motorist needs to understand winter tires radically outperform all-seasons in all cold-weather driving conditions.”

The superior traction and braking capabilities of winter tires are the result of advanced tire technology, particularly in tread design and rubber compounds. These advances have improved traction performance across all tire categories, but especially for winter tires. The “soft” tread compounds in today’s winter tires retain their flexibility even in extreme cold. At temperatures at or below 7 degrees Celsius, winter tires provide significantly better traction than all other types providing greater control on all cold-weather road surfaces and significantly shorter stopping distances.

 

“Research by the Quebec government shows that, since the winter tire law was enacted, the province saw a significant decrease in injury accidents in the province,” says Maidment. “Imagine the massive reduction in vehicle damage and personal suffering during the winter driving season across Canada if all drivers protected themselves and their families with winter tires.”

Survey Methodology

A survey of 1,633 Canadians was completed online during the period of October 9–12, 2017, utilizing Leger’s* online panel, LegerWeb. A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of +/-2.5%, 19 times out of 20.

 

About the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada

The Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC) is the national trade association representing tire makers, rubber products manufacturers and importers as well as rubber recyclers and suppliers of goods and services related to the industry. TRAC is committed to educating drivers about proper tire care and maintenance. A key advocacy goal in the cold-weather months is to raise awareness about safe winter driving and the safety and performance benefits of winter tires.

 

Media Contact:

 

TRAC Contact:

Email: info@tracanada.ca

Phone: 519.249.0366

www.tracanada.ca; www.betiresmart.ca

Twitter: @BeTireSmartCA

Facebook: betiresmartCA

 

Michelle Magee

Associate, Xposure PR

Email: michelle@xposurepr.com

Phone: (416)471-2336

Read the source article at CNW | www.newswire.ca

Beware of Aged Tires on Used Cars

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Say you’re in the market for a used car, and you’ve come across a gem of a 2005 model for sale. It’s clear that, with low miles and in pristine condition, the car was rarely driven and has been well cared for. There’s even a lot of tread left on the tires. Naturally, you’re interested in the purchase. Then you check out the sidewalls of the tires and find out they’re from 2005, too. Those tires are likely the original rubber.

Read the source article at Car News and Photos