Sumitomo Rubber joins Japan Hydrogen Association

Sumitomo Rubber has announced that it has joined the Japan Hydrogen Association after its membership application was approved mid-February. The Association’s aim is to promote global cooperation in every part of the hydrogen industry, alongside forming reliable supply chains for hydrogen.

Sumitomo says it is working to achieve net-zero CO2  emissions within its tire manufacturing processes by 2050, and has started to investigate the future use of hydrogen energy at its major tire factories in Japan.

Read the source article at Tire Technology International

Scrap Tire News | March 2021 Edition

In This Issue:

Kentucky Accepting Grant Applications For Crumb Rubber and Recycled Tire Projects

EnviroRail Changes Future Of Railroad Maintenance With Mechanical Concrete

Barclay Roto-Shred Has New Owners

KB Industries Forms New Sustainable Divisions …

Read the source article at Unauthorized Access

CARB will regulate tire pressure starting in July 2010

Last week, the California Air Resources Board – fresh from not banning black cars – adopted a regulation to force the 40,000 businesses in “California’s automotive maintenance industry to check the tire pressure of every vehicle they service.” This means that, starting in July of 2010, when you bring your car in for service in California, the shop will have to make sure that your tires filled to the manufacturer’s recommended air pressure level. CARB estimates that this will save the average Californian about $12 a year.

Read the source article at Yahoo

Bridgestone, ARLANXEO and Solvay launch TECHSYN for unrivalled environmental performance

Bridgestone, a global leader in sustainable mobility and advanced solutions, ARLANXEO, a world-leading synthetic rubber producer, and Solvay, one of the world´s top science companies and worldwide leader in Highly Dispersible Silica (HDS), both for innovation and for manufacturing, have today announced the launch of TECHSYN, a new, co-developed tyre technology platform enabling tyres to deliver unrivalled strength and environmental performance.

 

Read the source article at Automotive World

In 2050, MICHELIN tires will be 100% sustainable

By 2050, MICHELIN tires will be made entirely from renewable, recycled, biosourced or otherwise sustainable materials.

Inspired by the VISION concept tire introduced in 2017, an airless, connected, rechargeable and entirely sustainable solution, the Michelin Group is committed to making its tires 100% sustainable by 2050. Today, nearly 30%* of the components used in the manufacture of tires produced by the Michelin Group are already made from natural, recycled or otherwise sustainable raw materials. A Michelin tire is a high-tech product comprising more than 200 ingredients. The main one is natural rubber, but the many ingredients also include synthetic rubber, metal, fibers and components that strengthen a tire’s structure, like carbon black, silica and plasticizers (resins, etc.). Incorporated in perfect proportions, these materials interact to deliver an optimal balance of performance, driveability and safety, while steadily reducing the tire’s environmental impact.
Source: Michelin

Read the source article at Groupe Michelin

Michelin to ship tires by sail in effort to reduce emissions

French multinational Michelin Tire has signed up to ship some of the tires it makes in Nova Scotia across the Atlantic to France on a cargo vessel powered mainly by sail.

The agreement with Neoline, a startup shipping line based in Nantes, France, is being explained as an effort to reduce Michelin’s greenhouse gas emissions.

“This initiative and this new partnership promote innovation in the field of carbon-free transport,” Pierre-Martin Huet, Michelin Group’s supply chain director, said in a statement.

Michelin has committed to move about 100 containers a year from Halifax to the port of Saint-Nazaire in Brittany on a yet-to-be-built commercial sailing ship when it begins a new transatlantic service in 2023.

Read the source article at CBC.ca

Cleaner, stronger, harder: New tech improves sustainable concrete

Researchers have developed a new technology to manufacture concrete made from recycled materials that is stronger and more durable than the traditional product.

Recycled concrete aggregates made with everything from coffee cups to building rubble offer huge environmental benefits, from reducing landfill and COemissions, to saving natural resources and boosting the circular economy.

Despite ongoing improvements however, challenges with matching the strength and durability of traditional concrete have hindered the practical application of these sustainable alternatives.

Now researchers from RMIT have developed a new method for casting prefabricated concrete products made with rubber tyres and construction and demolition waste that are up to 35% stronger than traditional concrete.

Read the source article at RMIT University

Pirelli employs adaptive tread pattern and compounds for new all-season tire range

Pirelli has launched its latest all-season tire, the Cinturato All Season SF2, which is designed to provide a broad performance window across both winter and summer conditions. The company says this is possible due to a new compound and tread pattern design that adapts automatically to the different temperature peaks of summer and winter.

Read the source article at Tire Technology International

Improved Michelin tire geared for vans, pickups, and light trucks

Michelin unveiled its all-new Agilis 3 tire, designed specifically for light commercial vehicles including light trucks, vans, and pickups. During the online launch event, company executives explained how the need for “sustainable mobility” has been magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic — with logistics being a crucial cog of daily life.

Michelin thus sees the newest iteration of the Agilis line as a decisive answer to the even more important role of mobility during this time, and is another expression of how the brand is working to make tires last as long as possible while assuring safety and performance throughout their life cycle.

The Agilis 3 is particularly positioned to “play a central role in the new normal,” as it takes its place as Michelin’s primary product in the segment.

Read the source article at BusinessWorld

The long-and-winding road toward more circular tires

Ventures focused on circular economy advances haven’t historically represented a sexy funding category, but December and early January brought the closing of two high-profile investment infusions: $55 million for AMP Robotics, which is using artificial intelligence to reinvent recycling infrastructure, and $25 million for TerraCycle’s Loop venture, which combines e-commerce with reusable containers.

Indeed, if you poke deeper into developments during the long and winding road that was 2020, it appears more investors are becoming willing to kick the tires (so to speak) when it comes to companies focused on turning someone else’s waste into a saleable product that keeps said waste from winding up in a landfill. 

Read the source article at GreenBiz