Editorial: GM sustainable NR efforts off to impressive start

With climate change, deforestation and water becoming increasingly important issues, assuring natural rubber sustainability has become crucial to every industry that depends on NR. And while it’s been less than a year since General Motors pledged to support sustainable rubber production, it’s clear that the auto maker has made progress in this laudable goal.

Of course, tackling this issue isn’t a short-term goal, and one that can’t be done alone. To that end, the Detroit-based automotive giant has worked to gain the support of a wide coalition of allies to the effort. It’s encouraging, as well, to see the effort put forth over the past nine months.

Four of the world’s top tire producers were there last May when GM made its initial announcement, and the auto maker soon after had a prominent role in delivering presentations at Michelin’s advanced mobility conference in Montreal. Then this past November at a meeting of the Tire Industry Project, CEOs of 11 tire makers vowed to take the necessary steps to lead to sustainable NR.

Read the source article at Rubber and Plastics News

Tyromer Brings Tire-Derived Polymer to U.S. Retreading Market

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Tyromer Inc., a scrap tire devulcanization company,  is now producing a high performance, non-chemical devulcanized rubber made from crumb or retread buffing in the United States.

Their tire-derived polymer or TDP can actually increase performance when incorporated into a pre-cure tread compound and costs less than virgin material.

Read the source article at Tire Review

Kumho Petrochemical expects materials prices to rise

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Seoul – Kumho Petrochemical is expecting slight improvements in prices for butadiene and maybe also synthetic rubber over the coming months – in contrast to the roller-coaster trends of last year.

In its 2017 full year financial statement, the South Korean rubber and resin manufacturer said butadiene supply is forecast to be “stable” due to new operations in the region.

Read the source article at European Rubber Journal

TRAC Provides the Ministry with Recommendations on the Proposed End-of-life Tire Regulation in Ontario

The Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (www.tracanada.ca), which represents 16 major global tire manufacturers operating in Canada, as well as selected tire recyclers and suppliers, is pleased to offer its observations and recommendations to what is a very bold plan by Ontario to introduce individual producer responsibility for end-of-life tire management. Allowing individual market players to make… 

Read the TRAC recomendation on RRCEA Tire Regulation here.

Read the source article at cdn2.hubspot.net

How to up-cycle used tires into everyday items

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Tires are made up of approximately five gallons of oil, and other materials such as steel, fabric, wiring, and chemical compounds. Over hundreds of years these products eventually breakdown, but they do not biodegrade. They will continue to breakdown into microscopic pieces like plastic. As they breakdown, they leave behind residue that contaminates the soil leaving it damaged for years to come.

Read the source article at Traction News

Indiana to consider used tire bill

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INDIANAPOLIS—The Indiana legislature will consider a bill sponsored by the U.S. Tire Manufacturers Association that would ban the sale of unsafe used tires for road use.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Doublestar to build smart rubber recycling plant

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ZHUMADIAN, China – China’s tire maker Doublestar broke ground on its smart plant for scrap rubber recycling in Zhumadian in December, the company said.

Read the source article at Rubber and Plastics News

How Tire Recycling Supports Cryptocurrency Mining

An entrepreneurial cryptocurrency mining company has teamed up with the US firm that converts waste tires to energy, to power its cryptocurrency mining computers.

PRTI, a tire “thermal demanufacturing” company located in North Carolina, announced an unusual deal with Standard American Mining are running graphics cards-based cryptocurrency mining equipment to get several alternative cryptocurrencies, including Ethereum.

To convert waste tires into energy, one heats them to a specific temperature when tires start decomposing. Using tire pyrolysis or thermolysis process helps extract resources such as steel, burnable fuel and carbon black. The extracted fuel serves as the energy source powering turbines which, in turn, produce electricity. Thus, an onsite cryptocurrency mining farm gets its power supply.

The method of an underutilized electricity being used as a means to power computers isn’t new. However, the uncommon set-up proves that

Read the source article at weibold.com

Liberty Tire Recycling completes refinancing, concludes exchange offer

Pittsburgh-based Liberty Tire Recycling Holdco LLC and its subsidiaries have completed the refinancing of its existing term loan and exchange offer relating to its 11 percent second lien secured notes due 2021.

The transactions substantially deleverage the company’s balance sheet, reduce interest expense, extend the maturity of its term loan and notes, and better position Liberty Tire to capitalize on growth opportunities, according to the company.

As part of the transactions, Carlyle Strategic Partners IV L.P., an investment fund managed by The Carlyle Group, became Liberty Tire’s majority equity sponsor and is partnering with Liberty to provide additional strategic resources to support its continued success.

Read the source article at Recycling Today

AkzoNobel And Black Bear Team Up To Make Powder Coatings From Old Tires

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Tires that have reached the end of the road are being harvested for carbon black and used to produce powder coatings in a new cooperation between AkzoNobel and Dutch company Black Bear.

The cradle-to-cradle certified carbon black supplied by Black Bear – which is obtained from end-of-life tires – is being used as pigment in the eco-premium products developed by AkzoNobel’s Powder Coatings business.

Read the source article at Aftermarket News