ISRI2017: Scrap tire markets face multiple disruptions

Tire recycling has come a long way, says tire processing veteran and current consultant Terry Gray of Houston-based T.A.G. Resource Recovery. However, Gray also remarked while speaking at the Spotlight on Tires session at the ISRI2017 convention, some of the end markets for scrap tires are currently facing difficulties, causing a sense of disruption in the overall market. 

Gray said he started in the North American scrap tire processing sector in 1984, when as few as 1 percent of all scrap tires were being recycled. More than 30 years later, the industry can be described as “more mature” he said, with almost 90 percent of scrap tires now being processed for recycling. “That’s a pretty good track record,” said Gray.

The bad news for scrap tire processors are government-related obstacles being faced in several key end markets. Gray said a tax credit that had been available to users of tire-derived fuel (TDF) had expired in some states, “so [energy] plants are failing that had converted to TDF.”

He said officials in one such state, Michigan, are acknowledging they will need to find and boost alternative end markets for scrap tires, but Gray said in many New England states “It’s a real issue and they’ve got their heads in the sand.”

In the ground or crumb rubber markets, the sports field additive market had been emerging as a strong consumer, but that end market is taking a hit from (as yet unsubstantiated) claims that athletes coming into contact with crumb rubber on fields are experiencing health issues, including cancer.

By Gray’s estimate, some 30 percent of sports fields are in regions such as New England and California where regulators are advising turf managers to be wary of using crumb rubber. In 2015, 25 percent of crumb rubber was used on sports fields and another 23 percent as playground surfacing or as mulch, so shrinkage in any of those markets will cause considerable disruption, said Gray.

Gray characterized the rubberized asphalt market for ground tires as often subject to “wait and see” attitudes, but he said the manufactured products sector for molded rubber has been one brighter spot.

J.D. Wang, the CEO of California-based ReRubber LLC, says his company’s investors have been putting most of their R&D resources into the crumb rubber and powder categories, after acknowledging that the firm “has gone through eight years of disruption” itself. “In our first five years, we processed a lot, and failed a lot,” he commented.

ReRubber is now focusing on making rubber powder, researching and opening up end markets for the tire-derived powder to be used in protective and architectural coatings applications. The company is exploring a supply loop that Wang says allows it to “innovate” and conduct research in California, then more rapidly implement the ideas in Asia or “work out the kinks” there, and then bring successful ideas back to the United States.

Offering a point of view from state government, Elizabeth Hoover of the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) said in that state in the 1990s, TDF used at cement plants represented “about the only markets” for scrap tires.

She remarked that emissions concerns about zinc levels had harmed that market, and now the health questions surrounding the field turf market are presenting a new disruption. Unless scrap tire processors have diversified markets, “you have problems on your hands,” warned Hoover.

Her message to scrap tire processors was that states can provide help in the form of loans for equipment, workshops and conferences and assistance in identifying and developing end markets. She also remarked, however, that because of tight state budgets, “a lot of that [potential assistance] is beginning to dry up.”

ISRI2017 was in at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans April 22-27, 2017.

Read the source article at Recycling Today

Euro reycled rubber exposure data published

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HELSINKI — The European Chemicals Agency concluded recently there is “at most, a very low level of concern” from exposure to recycled rubber granules.

Read the source article at Tire Business

Global Reclaimed Rubber Market Forecast to 2021 and Key Companies are studied in a Latest Report Offered by The Market Reports

Global Reclaimed Rubber Industry 2017 Market Research Report provides the details about Industry Overview, Manufacturing Cost Structure, Capacity, Growth Rate, Gross Margin, Major Manufacturers, Development Trends and Forecast Analysis.

Read the source article at Press Release Distribution Services

ASTM committee to focus on recovered carbon black

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BRUSSELS – The formation of ASTM Committee D36, Recovered Carbon Black, may well be the biggest step forward the tire recycling technology known as pyrolysis has taken toward commercial success and mass acceptance.

Read the source article at Rubber and Plastics News

Tire recycling under pressure in UK

Leaders of the Tyre Recovery Association (TRA) and National Tyre Distributors Association (NTDA) are warning that tire recycling costs are increasing at an alarming rate across Great Britain. The associations assert that the increases are being driven by a mixture of regulatory changes and new market conditions. This leads to reprocessors and professional used tire collectors encountering rather challenging times.

Peter Taylor, secretary general of the TRA says: “Not only we face increased operating and fuel costs, added to which is the latest increase in the minimum wage but these are just aspect of the upward cost pressures that we experience.”

“We, the same as other automotive waste streams, encounter extremely significant costs which stem from new fire security guidelines introduced by the Environment Agency. They reduce capacity in various ways and exert further pressure on costs which will all have to be passed on,” Mr. Taylor says.

Members of TRA who account for over 70% of all used tires collected in Great Britain, are also hit by a plummeted demand for tire-derived fuel (TDF) in Asian export markets and elsewhere due to a four-fold rise in shipping costs.

Read the source article at weibold.com

ISRI Unveils International Scrap Trade Database

(Washington, DC) – The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) today launched a new International Scrap Trade Database providing information on international scrap trade flows. The data tables illustrate the trade of recyclables across the globe by major commodity and importing/exporting economies, and show the total amount of scrap traded globally.

“The scrap trade database is a one-stop shop that brings together for the first time statistics dedicated solely to the cross-border movement of scrap. This collection of information will prove valuable for traders, brokers, market analysts, government agencies, the press, and all those interested in the global recycling industry,” said Joe Pickard, chief economist for ISRI. “It also provides scrap processors and consumers insights to burgeoning markets and potential opportunities that can help grow their businesses. The data will also prove beneficial to the public as it showcases the critical role recycling plays in the global economy, and how scrap flows are deeply connected to developments in manufacturing. In addition, it demonstrates the importance of maintaining the free and fair trade of scrap around the world.”

The database is being released in advance of ISRI’s annual convention and exposition being held April 22-27, in New Orleans. The initial offering of international scrap trade figures covers volume flows in metric tonnage from 2005 to 2015 for ferrous scrap, nonferrous scrap, plastic scrap, and recovered paper. Tables for other recycled commodities and charts to help visualize trade flows are in development.

As an added benefit tied to the database, ISRI members can now request custom trade reports by scrap commodity, trading partner, volume, and dollar value by contacting ISRI Research Analyst Bernie Lee.

Read the source article at isri.org

Isri, Rma oppose Conn. recycling proposals

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HARTFORD, Conn. — The Rubber Manufacturers Association and Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries are opposing proposals from the Connecticut legislature that would create Extended Producer Responsibility systems for tire recycling.

Read the source article at Tire Business

C2C certification for Klean Industries’ pyrolysis plant

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Canada-based gasification and pyrolysis waste conversion technologies provider Klean Industries Inc. shares that one of its facilities has become the world’s first tyre pyrolysis plant to receive Cradle to Cradle (C2C) certification. This C2C certification by McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry LLC follows a 12-month study of the Klean Industries production process and the end uses of the recycled carbon and oil products that derive from it.

According to the company, one factor that sets it apart from other tyre pyrolysis technologies is its ability to convert tyre char into products that are utilised by end users in a multitude of product applications. “This is accomplished using our proprietary technologies that produce a recovered carbon black (rCB) to a standard unseen by any other technology providers, hence our commercial success,” shares Klean Industries in a statement. As far as the company is aware, it is currently the only group re-integrating recovered carbon black in new tyres with major tyre manufacturers around the globe.

Klean Industries’ certifications for technology and products include: ISO 9001, 14001, 14064, 14067; CE and UL ECOLOGO certifications; Carbon Footprint Certificates; Green Product Certificate; REACH Certification; EPD ClassII Enviro-Labeling 485 & 486; Cradle to Cradle Certified.

Read the source article at Tyrepress

Atlas Tire Hosts ATU

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Atlas Tire Wholesale recently hosted the summer edition of their renowned Atlas Tire University program. Besides hearing about the latest tire technologies and products, guests who attended the event also learned about the most up-to-date online marketing and social media strategies.

ATU invited social media expert, Casey Walter from Optimize Social Media in Oakdale, Minnesota to speak about strategies tire retailers can put into practice today in order to better position their companies online to compete in today’s challenging market.

Besides a host of Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Yelp, Google+ and Instagram strategies, Walter also spoke about online reputation management, and how to deal with disgruntled customers who complain about your tire business on social media.

Atlas Tire also invited Michal Majernik, Manager, Communications for the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC) to talk about the latest and most pertinent statistics tire statistics. Majernik also discussed the demise of the Ontario Tire Stewardship program, and explained how Ontario’s tire recycling infrastructure is likely to change in the near future.

In addition to a gourmet lunch, guests of Atlas Tire enjoyed giveaways and prizes throughout the day, as well as an opportunity to network with peers along with tire industry representatives and experts.

Read the source article at Autosphere.ca

What to expect at the ‘Scrap to Profit’ conference

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Innovation to drive new and improved scrap tire markets is a key theme for the 7th Scrap to Profit Conference scheduled for October 25-26, 2017 at The Inn at Opryland Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee.

Topics to be discussed will be non-commercial and include market discussions of tire derived fuel, civil engineering, and ground rubber markets. Also, research and education needs for new markets and recent innovations in scrap tire uses will be addressed.

Read the source article at Traction News